The Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials

The Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) Express Entry is an immigration program administered by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, the department responsible for immigration to Canada.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada has published a list of eligible trades under the National Occupational Classification (NOC):

  1. Major groups:
  2. Minor groups:

If you intend to immigrate to Canada under this program, one of the requirements is to have a confirmed employment offer or, particularly if you are already in Canada on a temporary basis, to obtain a certificate of qualification in that skilled trade issued by a provincial or territorial authority. Please note that provincial/territorial authorities are not set up to issue certificates of qualification to individuals outside Canada.

There is no education requirement for the FSTP. But, if you want to earn points for your education under Express Entry, you either need:

For more detailed information on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada's requirements for this immigration program, visit their Web site.

How to obtain a certificate of qualification?

Trades are regulated at the provincial and territorial level in Canada. In some cases, certification, licensing, or registration is available but not required by law.

Please note that provincial/territorial authorities are not set up to issue certificates of qualification to individuals outside Canada.

You may find detailed information on your occupation, including contact information for provincial and territorial authorities that issue certificates of qualification, by searching CICIC's Directory of occupational profiles.


What is the National Occupational Classification (NOC)?


The same occupation can be called different things in different countries. In Canada, organizations use the National Occupational Classification (NOC) to classify and describe occupations.

NOC consists of a specific occupation title (e.g., accountant) and a four-digit NOC code (e.g., 1111), along with a description for the occupation.

To find the title of your intended occupation in Canada and its NOC code, search the NOC Web site.

You can also learn more about NOC.