The Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials
The postsecondary education system in Manitoba is described in CICIC's Postsecondary Education Systems in Canada: Provinces and Territories. The system can be divided into six categories of postsecondary program delivery:
  • universities
  • public colleges
  • apprenticeship
  • private religious institutions
  • private vocational institutions
  • other

Quality assurance mechanisms in Manitoba's postsecondary education system vary by type of institution and program. They include:
  • legislation (statutes and regulations)
  • affiliation
  • credit transfer and articulation
  • external and internal review
  • professional accreditation
  • other organizations related to quality assurance

Legislation


The Advanced Education Administration Act is the primary statute governing postsecondary education in Manitoba. Under the Act, the Minister is responsible for assessing the province's educational needs, approving new programs, determining priorities and allocating funding. The Program Approval Regulation under the Act establishes a clear process for the administration of program approvals. The Department of Education and Training consults extensively with Manitoba's postsecondary institutions and develops consistent and effective criteria for measuring university performance.

Institutional acts establish the governance structures, including the operations of a board of governors, regents, or governing council, and a senate or learning council. Individual institutional acts do not contain explicit reference to mechanisms for accountabilities pertaining to quality assurance of educational programming. Program quality responsibilities are implied through the powers and duties assigned to institutions' internal governing bodies. 

The Advanced Education Administration Act prohibits the Minister of Education and Training from interfering with the basic rights of a university to formulate academic policies or standards, to set standards of admission or graduation, and to appoint staff.  

The Degree Granting Act, restricts who may grant degrees to institutions with legislated authority or are listed in the Act as having such authority. Manitoba's five public degree-granting universities include Brandon University, Université de Saint-Boniface, University College of the North, University of Manitoba and University of Winnipeg.


Affiliation


The Université de Saint-Boniface maintains an affiliation agreement with the University of Manitoba that facilitates credit transfer between the institutions, as well as providing a governance framework for their many joint programs.


External and internal review


Manitoba takes multiple approaches to ensure the quality of public university programs. This includes institutional internal review processes, external reviews, and the government's approval process of new programs.

New programs are subject to the approval of the university's senate, which evaluates the design, content, delivery, faculty capacity, and resources of any new program that the university will introduce. External reviews of a newly proposed program are conducted by other post-secondary institutions, industry experts, and/or the regulator or accreditation body in the field, as appropriate. 


Professional accreditation


Many of Canada's regulated professions have associations that conduct accreditation reviews of programs pertaining to their professions. Professional accreditation teams review reports provided by an institution and may conduct on-site visits in accordance with the policies and procedures established by the professions. The Association of Accrediting Agencies of Canada (AAAC) is a national organization composed of professional associations involved in promoting good practices by its members in the accreditation of professional programs.

Legislation


In Manitoba, there are four private religious degree-granting institutions, including the Booth University College, Canadian Mennonite University, Providence University College, and Steinbach Bible College.

Booth University College was established under the Salvation Army William and Catherine Booth University College Incorporation Act and is governed by a board of trustees. The college was given degree-granting powers by the Legislature of Manitoba in 1983. 

The Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) was established under the Mennonite College Federation Act. A a board of governors and senate governs CMU. The senate is responsible for the academic policies of the university.  

Providence University College was established under the Providence College and Theological Seminary Incorporation Act and is governed by a board of directors.

Steinbach Bible College is authorized under letters patent to operate as a college and seminary and is listed under the Degree Granting Act as having the authority to grant degrees.
 

External and internal review


The Department of Education and Training provides operating funding to private religious/denominational institutions. Funding conditions require private religious institutions to provide the department with a report on the activities supported by the funding and an annual report, inclusive of audited financial statements.

Legislation


The Advanced Education Administration Act is the primary statute governing postsecondary education in Manitoba. Under the Act, the Minister is responsible for assessing the province's educational needs, approving new programs, determining priorities and allocating funding. The Program Approval Regulation under the Act establishes a clear process for the administration of program approvals. The Department of Education and Training consults extensively with Manitoba's postsecondary institutions and develops consistent and effective criteria for measuring college performance.

The Colleges Act and The Red River College Act establishes Assiniboine Community College and Red River College as Manitoba's two public colleges. These institutions are responsible for enhancing the economic and social well-being of the province through the provision of a broad range of educational opportunities. Both colleges are able to provide certificate and diploma level programming. Red River College is the only public degree-granting college in Manitoba.

The colleges are required to submit annual reports, including audited financial statements, annual academic reports, and any other information that the Minister requests. The Minister must table these reports in the provincial legislature.

The Minister of Education and Training may designate college mandates; establish guidelines for education and training, including program evaluation guidelines; appoint persons or committees to review and evaluate college programs; and appoint persons to inspect any matter related to the management and operation of a college.

The Advanced Education Administration Act prohibits the Minister of Education and Training from interfering with the basic rights of a college to formulate academic policies or standards, to set standards of admission or graduation, and to appoint staff.


Affiliation


Manitoba's public colleges have no formal affiliations with universities or other colleges, however they regularly enter into partnerships such as Memorandums of Understanding regarding programming, student transitions, and other system-level priorities.


External and internal review


Manitoba takes multiple approaches to ensure the quality of public college programs. This includes institutional internal review processes, external reviews, and the government's approval process of new programs.

New programs are subject to the internal program approval process at the college. The College's board is responsible for ensuring the quality of their college programs by regularly reviewing them. Other post-secondary institutions, industry experts, and/or regulators or accreditation bodies in the field conduct external reviews as appropriate. 


Professional accreditation


Many of Canada's regulated professions have associations that conduct accreditation reviews of programs pertaining to their professions. Professional accreditation teams review reports provided by an institution and may conduct on-site visits in accordance with the policies and procedures established by the professions.The Association of Accrediting Agencies of Canada (AAAC) is a national organization composed of professional associations involved in promoting good practices by its members in the accreditation of professional programs.

Apprenticeship training in Manitoba combines on-the-job workplace training and technical instruction. The Apprenticeship and Certification Act establishes the Apprenticeship and Certification Board and the Minister of Education and Training as the governing bodies responsible for training and certification in the designated skilled trades training in Manitoba. Under the Act, the Board is appointed by and accountable to the Minister. The Board develops objectives, standards, and requirements for apprenticeship and certification in designated trades and — with the approval of the Minister — makes regulations respecting trades and apprenticeship. The Board appoints trade-specific Provincial Advisory Committees (PACs) to provide advice on regulation content and training standards in each designated trade.

Apprenticeship Manitoba, a branch of Manitoba Education and Training, is responsible for providing overall policy and regulatory coordination for the skilled trades in addition to delivering certification examinations and for issuing Certificates of Qualifications. A Certificate of Qualification is recognized by employers as being a valuable work credential. Nine of Manitoba's designated trades are compulsory trades, meaning that only persons who hold a Certificate of Qualification or are registered apprentices may work in the trade.


External and internal review


The Red Seal Occupational Standard (RSOS) and the the National Occupational Analysis (NOA) are documents produced by the Red Seal Secretariat operating under the direction of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship and Employment and Social Development Canada. They are used to set the national program standards for a trade, outlining the tasks of a trade for training purposes, and develop item banks for interprovincial certification examinations.

Manitoba is a member jurisdiction of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program. Apprenticeship Manitoba participates in the development of examination and standards products used by all jurisdictions in the pan-Canadian program. Apprenticeship Manitoba also facilitates the development of occupational analyses for trades that are not interprovincially recognized.

The program standards (technical training) for each trade are developed by a Provincial Advisory Committee (PAC) comprised of representatives from industry, or by an industry working group working for or with the PAC. College instructors may provide input into the development of program standards at the request of the PAC. Apprenticeship Manitoba staff facilitate the curriculum development process. The Apprenticeship and Certification Board approves curriculum content and certification standards for each trade or occupation, based on PAC recommendations.

Technical training is delivered primarily by Manitoba's colleges through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Apprenticeship Manitoba, is responsible for providing the standards of course content and each training provider plays a role in ensuring the quality of its services.

A review of program content takes place approximately every five years. Overall apprentice success on the final certification examination is reviewed on an ongoing basis. Pan-Canadian reviews of examination results are conducted on an as-needed basis.

Legislation


The Private Vocational Institutions Act sets out requirements for the operation of registered private vocational institutions in Manitoba. The purpose of the Act is to register and regulate the province's private career colleges, provide a degree of consumer protection to students enrolled in registered programs offered by these institutions, and ensure that institutions provide the skills and knowledge required for entry-level employment in the vocation for which instruction or training is offered. A private vocational institution may operate in the province only if it is registered with the Department of Education and Training. The institutions are only registered after the Director of Private Vocational Institutions is satisfied that the school can reasonably be expected to be financially responsible in its operations, will provide appropriate vocational training to students, and meets the requirements of the Act and regulations. The department may inspect any vocational institution at any time to observe methods of instruction and inspect materials used in the programs of study.

While use of the terms “university” and “varsity” (and their French equivalents) is protected under the Degree Granting Act in Manitoba, private vocational institutions may call themselves “colleges,” as there is no restriction on the use of this term.

These institutions can grant diplomas or certificates but may not grant degrees. The Private Vocational Institutions Regulation (the regulations made under The Private Vocational Institutions Act), sets our requirements as to amount and type of financial security schools must provide, students contributions to the Training Completion Fund, the manner in which tuition refunds must be calculated, and the requirements of enrollment contracts. It also prescribes the registration requirements for private vocational institutions, the various fees payable by schools and by students to schools, renewal and cancellation requirements of private vocational institutions registration, and forms that private vocational institutions may use.

Students who attend registered private vocational institutions program may be eligible to apply for student financial assistance provided that the programs are also designated for the purposes of the Canada and Manitoba student loan program. These institutions may also deliver non-registered programs (programs that are exempt from the legislation). However, students in these programs are not eligible to apply for student aid and are not protected by the Training Completion Fund, an insurance fund that is maintained by the director and funded by student contributions collected by the institutions.


External and internal review


All applications for private vocational institution and program registration must be reviewed by the Registration and Accountability Office and approved by the Director As part of the program review, the Registration and Accountability Office will examine entrance requirements, the labour market needs, employer attestations, as well as instructional materials, facilities, equipment, and instructor's qualifications, prior to registering new programs.

Private Vocational Institutions are also subject to audits and sites visits conducted by the Registration and Accountability Office.  

Information on private vocational institutions' internal review processes may be available from individual schools.

International College of Manitoba (ICM)


Legislation

In September 2008, the International College of Manitoba (ICM) was established in Manitoba as a pathway for first-year undergraduate international students seeking eventual admission to degree studies at the University of Manitoba (UM). Legally, the nature of ICM's partnership with UM is contractual and is subject to ongoing renewal between the two partners. As the partnership exists by virtue of private contract, ICM is not directly governed by nor subject to statutory provisions under the laws of Manitoba.

ICM is a private institution. Its parent company, Navitas, is listed as a publicly traded company on the Sydney Stock Exchange (ASX) and is therefore subject to securities and other trading laws and regulations in Australia.

External and internal review

ICM offers first- and second-year undergraduate courses exclusively to international students who intend to seek admission to the University of Manitoba (UM) after completing the required courses. UM and ICM work collaboratively to ensure that students who complete ICM courses are able to transition those credits towards their UM programming.

Admission Officers, in keeping with standing admission processes at UM, review ICM graduate transcripts and courses when applying to UM upon completely their ICM programming.


Manitoba Institute of Trades and Technology (MITT)


Legislation

The Manitoba Institute of Trades and Technology (formerly Winnipeg Technical College) was originally established in 1983 as the South Winnipeg Technical Centre as regional vocational school in partnership between three school divisions, pursuant to section 49(1) of the Public Schools Act.

 

 

MITT succeeded the Winnipeg Technical College on July 1, 2014, (established under The Manitoba Institute of Trades and Technology Act) and now stands as a recognized provincial institute with a mandate to provide both secondary and postsecondary technical career education. MITT has the authority in legislation to offer an approved high-school program of study. MITT provides a variety of adult postsecondary programs, including joint programs with public postsecondary institutions, at the certificate and diploma levels.

External and internal review

MITT programming for secondary students is subject to funding and approval by the Department of Education and Training. The department must review and approve any courses in which secondary students enrol at MITT, in order to complete their high school diploma in Manitoba.

All secondary and postsecondary programs are subject to MITT's internal academic regulations and procedures, and are reviewed by industry/professional regulators where appropriate.