The Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials

Universities


While a province-wide process for conducting credit transfer does not exist, Ontario has encouraged colleges and universities in the province to work together to develop collaborative arrangements between the institutions. These arrangements include credit transfer agreements, degree-completion programs, concurrent and consecutive programs, and joint-integrated programming.

Through credit-transfer arrangements, colleges and universities mutually recognize some of the learning achieved by a student in the other sector. Credit-transfer agreements can take the form of formal articulation agreements between institutions or be on an ad hoc basis. Some or all of the credits achieved by a student in one institution may be recognized by another institution. Details of credit-transfer arrangements among Ontario's publicly funded colleges and universities can be found in the Ontario College University Transfer Guide.

The Ontario College University Degree Completion Accord sets out a series of principles for developing degree-completion arrangements between publicly funded colleges and universities. Through this type of arrangement, colleges and at least one university negotiate an articulation agreement under which graduates of a diploma program will receive full credit toward a university degree for their diploma program. Each agreement requires approval by the relevant government bodies of the institutions.

Through concurrent programs, institutions partner to offer two programs, one leading to a diploma, the other to a degree. Partnering institutions work out their own administrative governance functions. Another form of credit recognition between institutions occurs through consecutive programming. Under this form of agreement, colleges and universities negotiate an agreement on block transfer of credit for related programs. The block credit-transfer agreement usually specifies less than full credit for the full diploma program. Admission preference is usually given to graduates of the relevant diploma program.

Through joint-integrated programs, two or more distinct "free-standing" programs in two or more institutions are integrated into one program. The program is delivered by one or more institutions from each sector.For example, Sheridan College and York University offer a bachelor of design honours degree. Students receive one degree in four years, with courses taught at both institutions.


Colleges


While a province-wide process for conducting credit transfer does not exist, Ontario has encouraged colleges and universities in the province to work together to develop collaborative arrangements among institutions. These arrangements include credit-transfer agreements, degree-completion programs, concurrent and consecutive programs, and joint-integrated programming.

 

Through credit-transfer arrangements, colleges and universities mutually recognize some of the learning achieved by a student in the other sector. Credit-transfer agreements can take the form of formal articulation agreements between institutions, or be on an ad hoc basis. Some or all of the credits achieved by a student in one school may be recognized by another institution. Details of credit-transfer arrangements between Ontario colleges and universities can be found in the Ontario College University Transfer Guide.

The Ontario College University Degree Completion Accord sets out a series of principles for developing degree-completion arrangements between colleges and universities. Through this type of arrangement, colleges and at least one university negotiate an articulation agreement under which graduates of a diploma program will receive full credit toward a university degree for their diploma program. Each agreement requires approval by the relevant government bodies of the institutions.

Through concurrent programs, institutions partner to offer two programs, one leading to a diploma, the other to a degree. Partnering institutions work out their own administrative governance functions. Another form of credit recognition between institutions occurs through consecutive programming. Under this form of agreement, colleges and universities negotiate an agreement on a block transfer of credit for related programs. The block credit-transfer agreement usually specifies less than full credit for the full diploma program. Admission preference is usually given to graduates of the relevant diploma program. Through joint-integrated programs, two or more distinct, "free-standing" programs in two or more institutions are integrated into one program. The program is delivered by one or more institutions from each sector. For example, Sheridan College and York University offer a bachelor of design honours degree. Students receive one degree in four years, with courses taught at both institutions.




Comprehensive review of this information: January 2019