Postsecondary Education Systems in Canada:
Provinces and Territories



Postsecondary Education in Alberta

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

The advanced education system in Alberta is guided by a set of Campus Alberta principles and objectives. Campus Alberta aims to ensure that key stakeholders in the advanced education system collaborate to deliver seamless opportunities for all Albertans to participate in lifelong learning.

Integral to the Campus Alberta vision is the Roles and Mandates Policy Framework for Alberta's Publicly Funded Advanced Education System. Released in 2007, the Framework categorizes publicly funded institutions into a six-sector model and sets out a range of academic programming, research activity and learner focus for each sector. By defining six broad types of publicly funded institutions, the Framework serves as a foundation for building an integrated adult learning system that is resilient, effective and collaborative.

The six sectors defined by the Roles and Mandates Policy Framework are:

Outside of the publicly funded system, ministerially-approved or licensed adult learning is also offered in Alberta by private vocational training providers, non-resident institutions, and one for-profit private degree-granting institution.

The program approval process of the Ministry of Enterprise and Advanced Education is designed to promote system development and coordination. The department reviews program proposals in light of a number of key considerations including fit with the institutional mandate and strategic plan, fit with provincial planning frameworks, relationship of the proposed program to existing programs within the institution and across the province, student and economic demand, and the institution's resource capacity. The Campus Alberta Quality Council (CAQC) makes recommendations to the Minister on the quality of new degree proposals and monitors the quality of approved degree programs.

The Alberta Council on Admissions and Transfer (ACAT) contributes to Campus Alberta through the development of policies, guidelines, and procedures to promote student mobility throughout the advanced education system. This is achieved by facilitating agreements for transfer of course credits among provincial institutions and encouraging initiatives that increase access for learners, such as prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR).

The Campus Alberta model is strengthened through a commitment to online learning and the application of technology to support high-quality learning outcomes. To this end, eCampusAlberta, a consortium of 15 publicly funded postsecondary institutions, facilitates increased access to collaborative online learning opportunities that span the province, and Alberta-North provides facilities, learning technologies, and support services to over 80 online learning sites across northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

The Ministry of Enterprise and Advanced Education is committed to accessible postsecondary education through increased system capacity and access for students. As well, it continues to explore new learning opportunities for Albertans in rural and remote areas. The ministry is dedicated to raising awareness about planning for post-secondary studies as it encourages parents to prepare financially and motivates students and educators to get involved in the planning process. Assistance with planning is readily available to support all Albertans in their learning pursuits.

ToC / TdM History

The formal postsecondary system in Alberta began when the first government adopted the creation of a provincial university as a high priority. The University of Alberta began operation in 1908 under government policy that reflected a centralized university model. Over time, the centralized model was challenged and branch campuses in Calgary and Lethbridge were established. Eventually, increasing demand for university education led to the establishment of the University of Calgary in 1966, and then later the establishment of the University of Lethbridge. Athabasca University, modeled on the British "open university," was set up in the 1970s to provide distance education programs, primarily to part-time adult learners. In 2009, two baccalaureate and applied studies institutions were renamed to Grant MacEwan University and Mount Royal University in recognition of their role in providing bachelor's degrees.

In 1916, the province began funding vocational training and opened the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art with a mandate to provide technical training to returning soldiers, industrial arts teachers and the "maturing youth" of the province. The provincial and federal support of technical vocational training and the rapid economic growth of the province through the oil boom in the 1950s and, to a greater extent, recent growth in the province, have helped shape Alberta's focus on technical and vocational training and the evolution of Alberta's Apprenticeship and Industry Training system.

Private colleges emerged in Alberta in 1903 and formed the basis for college-level education in the province. In 1957, Alberta's first public junior college opened in Lethbridge. The early versions of the University Act also contained provisions that formed the basis for establishment of junior colleges through affiliation agreements and with university delegated authority over these colleges. By the late 1960s, a network of colleges and polytechnical institutions had been established in centres throughout the province.

In 2004, the ministry responsible for advanced education combined its Universities Act, Banff Centre Act, Colleges Act, and Technical Institutes Act into one comprehensive Post-secondary Learning Act to support the Campus Alberta vision and to further educational opportunities in the province. The Act also opened opportunities for more institutions to offer degree programs and established the Campus Alberta Quality Council as a key player in the degree program approval process. Prior to the proclamation of the Post-secondary Learning Act, the ministry introduced a new Private Vocational Training Regulation that updated, reorganized, and clarified the requirements of the former regulation. Alberta's postsecondary system will continue to enhance and improve upon the Campus Alberta model to suit the learning needs of all Albertans.

In 2007, the Ministry of Enterprise and Advanced Education released the Roles and Mandates Policy Framework for Alberta's Publicly Funded Advanced Education System. The Framework categorizes the province's public postsecondary institutions into a six-sector model that indicates the types of programs an institution offers, as well as its research activity and learner focus.

Alberta's Post-secondary Learning Act and the Roles and Mandates Policy Framework are intended to advance the concept of Campus Alberta by further developing a postsecondary system that is accessible, flexible, and responsive to the needs of all Albertans.

ToC / TdM Types of Institutions and Programs

In Alberta, with the exception of the boards of Independent Academic Institutions and the board of The Banff Centre, the governing boards of publicly funded postsecondary institutions are appointed by the Minister responsible for advanced education.

Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions (CARIs)

Alberta has four universities categorized as Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions (CARIs) under the Roles and Mandates Policy Framework: the University of Alberta, the University of Calgary, the University of Lethbridge, and Athabasca University. The Universities of Alberta, Calgary, and Lethbridge are campus-based, while Athabasca University is a distance-learning university. Credentials awarded by the universities include bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees.

The University of Alberta and the University of Calgary offer a broad range of graduate and undergraduate degree programs and account for most of the province's university research capabilities. The University of Lethbridge offers undergraduate degree programs and some graduate degree programs, and also provides the first two years of study in fields such as medicine, dentistry, and engineering for transfer to other institutions. Athabasca University, specializing in part-time and distance education, offers undergraduate degree programs in fields such as business, integrated studies, distance education, science, and nursing.

Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institutions (BASIs)

Alberta has two Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institutions (BASIs): Grant MacEwan University in Edmonton and Mount Royal University in Calgary. These institutions are publicly funded and provide a range of programming from academic upgrading to baccalaureate degrees, including applied degrees. Their research activity is largely focused on applied research and scholarly activity to enhance their instructional mandate.

Polytechnical Institutions (PIs)

Alberta has two Polytechnical Institutions (PIs): the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in Edmonton and the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in Calgary. These institutions may offer apprenticeship, certificates, diplomas, applied degrees, and in limited cases, other baccalaureate degrees. They also offer continuing education programs and are increasingly involved in applied research initiatives. Polytechnical Institutions respond to market needs and offer programs tailored to workplace requirements.

Comprehensive Community Institutions (CCIs)

 Alberta has eleven public colleges in the Comprehensive Community Institutions (CCIs) sector of the Roles and Mandates Policy Framework. These colleges provide a range of programming from academic upgrading to applied degrees. They may also offer apprenticeship technical training, the first two years of certain baccalaureate degree programs, and baccalaureate degrees in collaboration with degree-granting institutions. Research activity at CCIs is largely focused on applied research and scholarly activity to enhance their instructional mandate.

The colleges within the CCI sector are also responsible for providing stewardship of adult learning opportunities for defined geographic regions within the province. This includes the operation of community adult learning centres that provide non-credit part-time courses in the areas of adult literacy, English as a second language, employability enhancement, and other continuing education topics.

Independent Academic Institutions (IAIs)

Alberta has five Independent Academic Institutions (IAIs). Called university colleges, they are considered private institutions, although they may receive public funding for approved degree programs. In addition to baccalaureate degrees, they may also offer master's degrees in specified areas, as well as independent programming through which they may issue their own certification or certification through other national or international bodies. Some of Alberta's Independent Academic Institutions have religious denominational affiliations; however, students of all faiths are welcome. They may also offer divinity programs and degrees which do not need approval of the minister responsible for advanced education.

Specialized Arts and Culture Institutions (SACIs)

Alberta has two Specialized Arts and Culture Institutions (SACIs), each of which serves a unique set of learners. The Alberta College of Art and Design offers a range of degree and diploma programming focused on visual culture and design. The Banff Centre specializes in non-credit professional development opportunities in fine arts, management studies, language training, and environmental training. Banff Centre students usually have academic credentials and/or professional experience in their area of study.

Apprenticeship and Industry Training

The Alberta apprenticeship and industry training system is an industry-driven system. Industry (employers and employees) establishes training and certification standards in more than 50 designated trades and occupations and provides direction to the system through an industry committee network and the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board. The government provides the legislative framework and administrative support. In addition to sitting on the committees, individual employers support the apprenticeship and industry training system by employing and training apprentices, thereby providing them with the opportunity to develop their skills on the job.

Ten public postsecondary institutions (Polytechnical Institutions and Comprehensive Community Institutions) provide most of the apprenticeship technical training in Alberta, based on course outcomes developed by Alberta industry. Trade and occupational certificates are granted by the Minister responsible for advanced education, and are held in high regard across Canada. Alberta consistently trains approximately 20 per cent of the nation's apprentices.

Private Vocational Trainers offering licensed programs

There are approximately 150 private traines that offer licensed vocational training in Alberta. The programs they provide respond to current labour market demand. Licensed vocational programs prepare students for employment in a wide variety of occupations. Although private vocational trainers do not receive operating funding from the government, student financial assistance may be available to students enrolled in licensed vocational programs. Private vocational trainers offer their own credentials for licensed programs.

Differences between certificate, diploma, and degree programs at universities, colleges, and technical institutes

Alberta trade certificate (apprenticeship) programs are available in approximately 50 designated trades in Alberta. Apprenticeship starts with choosing a trade and finding an employer willing to hire an apprentice. Apprenticeship programs in most of the trades take between three and four years to complete. Apprentices spend about 80 per cent of their time gaining on-the-job training and experience and 20 per cent attending classes at a Polytechnical Institution or Comprehensive Community Institution. Certified journeypersons who complete Alberta trade certificate requirements and successfully write an Interprovincial Standards (Red Seal) Program examination are able to work in other provinces and territories where the designation is recognized.

Certificate programs prepare students for entry into specific occupations. They normally involve one year or less of full-time study at a Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institution, Polytechnical Institution, Comprehensive Community Institution, private vocational trainer or, in some instances, at a Comprehensive Academic and Research Institution. Certificate programs normally require the completion of some high school studies for admission. Certificate programs at Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions have varying admission requirements such as high school completion, mature student status, or some postsecondary education.

Diploma programs generally prepare students for employment in a particular field or group of occupations. They normally involve two years of full-time study at a Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institution, Polytechnical Institution, Comprehensive Community Institution, private vocational trainer, or in some instances at a Comprehensive Academic and Research Institution. Diploma programs may require high school completion or specific grades and subjects for admission. Diploma programs at Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions normally involve the equivalent of one year of academic study beyond a bachelor's degree and may be applicable to related master's degree programs.

Applied degree programs provide enhanced career preparation at the bachelor's level that applies to a broader range of career and employment opportunities beyond entry level in an industry. Some Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institutions, Polytechnical Institutions, and Comprehensive Community Institutions offer these programs, which consist of about three years of academic studies and about one year of related, supervised work experience in industry. Applied degree programs may have admission requirements similar to those of diploma programs. Completion of a related diploma program may be a prerequisite for admission into year three of an applied degree program.

Bachelor's degree programs usually require four years to complete but program length may vary by discipline and institution. Programs longer than four years often incorporate a co-op or work study component. For information on admission, please consult the "Admission Requirements" section below. Bachelor's degree programs may be offered only by institutions that have received approval from the Minister responsible for advanced education (except for degrees in divinity). In order to receive approval, institutions must meet specific quality requirements consistent with the Ministerial Statement on Quality Assurance of Degree Education in Canada. In Alberta, bachelor's degree programs are currently offered at four Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions, two Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institutions, two Polytechnical Institutions, five Independent Academic Institutions, one Specialized Arts and Culture Institution, and one private for-profit institution.

Master's degree programs normally involve two years of full-time university study beyond the bachelor's degree level. These programs require a bachelor's degree for admission. Applicants who have a three-year bachelor's degree are usually required to complete an additional qualifying year. Master's programs may be thesis- or course-based. These programs may be offered only by institutions that have received approval from the Minister responsible for advanced education (except for degrees in divinity). In order to receive approval, institutions must meet specific quality requirements consistent with the Ministerial Statement on Quality Assurance of Degree Education in Canada. Currently, master's programs are offered by each of the four Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions as well as at one Independent Academic Institution and a number of non-resident institutions.

Doctoral degree programs normally require two or three years of full-time university study and research beyond the master's degree level. Doctoral programs involve planning and carrying out high-quality research leading to advanced knowledge in the student's field of study. These programs normally include the preparation of a dissertation on an approved topic. Doctoral degree programs may be offered only by institutions that have received approval from the Minister responsible for advanced education (except for degrees in divinity). In order to receive approval, institutions must meet specific quality requirements consistent with the Ministerial Statement on Quality Assurance of Degree Education in Canada. In Alberta, doctoral degrees are offered by each of the four Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions.

Community Adult Learning Councils (CALCs)

There are approximately 80 Community Adult Learning Councils (CALCs) that support community-based initiatives in small, medium, and large communities across the province. Their programming enhances and complements other parts of the learning system in Alberta, including the public postsecondary system, the secondary system, and the private education and training sector. They provide support for identifying and meeting needs in the community that are not met by others.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Alberta has three years of senior high school, grades 10 through 12, leading to an Alberta high school diploma.

Publicly funded institutions normally require a high school diploma for admission to certificate and diploma programs, but academic requirements vary by program. Prospective students should consult the institution(s) of their choice for details.

Each degree-granting institution in Alberta sets its own admission requirements as well as criteria for recognizing academic qualifications obtained in Canadian jurisdictions and abroad. Typically, five grade 12-level courses (or equivalents) are required. Admission averages required to enter an undergraduate program, either directly from high school or through transfer from another postsecondary institution, vary by institution, faculty, and program. Admission to programs that have enrolment limits may require competitive marks higher than the minimum admission requirements set out in the academic calendar. Mature applicants who do not meet normal admission requirements may be considered with differing qualifications. Competency in English is required of foreign students. Prospective students should consult the institution(s) of their choice for further details on admission.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

Enterprise and Advanced Education aims to provide accessible, affordable, high-quality learning opportunities in Alberta. The Province of Alberta provides a comprehensive student financial assistance program for Albertans to ensure that financial need is not a barrier to learners' success in their postsecondary pursuits.

Students who apply for funding for full-time study are considered for financial assistance that may consist of a combination of federal and provincial loans and grants. Students may also qualify for provincial loan reduction when they complete their studies. Alberta Students Finance also provides funding for part-time study and processes applications for various scholarships and bursaries.

The Tuition Fees Regulation limits tuition fee increases to a composite Alberta Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canadian citizens and permanent residents. Public postsecondary institutions in Alberta have the flexibility to set differential fees for students who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada. Fees charged to international students vary by institution but are generally competitive with those of postsecondary institutions in other Canadian provinces.

To view the most current tuition and fees for Canadian citizens, permanent residents and international students, please consult institutions' websites or contact the institution(s) directly. International students may consult the following web page for tuition and fee estimates: http://www.studyinalberta.ca/post-secondary/tuition.aspx.

The Government of Alberta offers a range of student awards and student financial assistance programs. Information about these programs is available at http://eae.alberta.ca/funding/scholarships.aspx.

Many of Alberta's postsecondary institutions also offer a considerable number of awards and scholarships to Canadian citizens, permanent residents and international students. Information is available at http://alis.alberta.ca/et/fo/pay/scholarships.html as well as on institutional websites.

Revision: 2011-04-13


Postsecondary Education in British Columbia

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

British Columbia's public postsecondary education system is one of the most comprehensive and diversified in the world. Postsecondary education in British Columbia is delivered by 25 publicly funded institutions. These include four research-intensive universities, seven teaching-intensive universities, eleven colleges, and three provincial institutes (including one Aboriginal institute). A detailed description of these institutions can be found on the Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development web site.

Currently, the private postsecondary education sector consists of 15 private academic degree-granting institutions, three public institutions from jurisdictions outside British Columbia, 12 theological colleges, and a wide range of career training institutions.

The Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development develops educational, professional and economic opportunities for British Columbia's learners by providing and supporting a wide range of postsecondary programs and encouraging relationships between educational institutions, business, and industry. The ministry provides provincial and national leadership and support for excellent and accessible postsecondary education that cultivates life-long learners throughout the province.

The Industry Training Authority Act was passed in 2003, establishing an authority to oversee British Columbia's industry training and apprenticeship system, to ensure that it is effective and efficient and that it meets the needs of employers and trainees. The Industry Training Authority (ITA) develops policy, performance standards, training programs, and assessment tools. It provides services for employers, training participants, and those who wish to pursue certification based on existing skills.

Private postsecondary institutions have a long history of offering educational programs in British Columbia. Under the Degree Authorization Act (DAA), private postsecondary institutions may apply for ministerial consent to offer and advertise degree programs, grant degrees, and use the word "university" in the province. Under the DAA, private postsecondary institutions and public postsecondary institutions from other jurisdictions are required to undergo a quality assessment process in order to obtain ministerial consent. As a matter of policy, British Columbia public institutions seeking approval to offer new degree programs must undergo the same quality assessment process.

Private career training institutions in British Columbia are overseen by the Private Career Training Institutions Agency (PCTIA), a Crown agency established under the Private Career Training Institutions Act. PCTIA oversees the mandatory registration and voluntary accreditation of private career training institutions in the province. Institutions providing career training of 40 hours or more instruction and requesting $1,000 or more tuition are required to register with PCTIA. Institutions not required to register may do so on a voluntary basis. PCTIA is also responsible for managing the Student Training Completion Fund, which provides tuition protection for students if their school closes before they have completed their program of study.

There are more than 350 registered private career training institutions in British Columbia, of which almost 175 are accredited. Registration ensures consumer protection and basic education standards to students enrolled in career training programs. In order to secure accreditation with PCTIA, institutions undergo a rigorous quality assurance process. PCTIA institutions provide a range of education choices for students, offering a diverse range of career training options from information technology, business administration, and hospitality services to film production, flight training, and horticulture studies.

ToC / TdM History

British Columbia's postsecondary education system has expanded significantly since its beginnings early in the 20th century. The University of British Columbia (UBC), officially incorporated in 1908, operated as the province's only public university until 1963. That year, the Province passed legislation to establish Simon Fraser University (SFU), which opened in 1965. The University of Victoria (UVic) was founded in 1903 as Victoria College, an affiliate of McGill University in Montreal. The University received degree-granting status and moved to its Gordon Head campus in 1963.

During the past 40 years, the system has seen further developments to increase access to postsecondary education. The British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) was founded in 1964. Later, community colleges were established throughout the province. In 1978, the Open Learning Institute, the Justice Institute, and the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design (ECIAD) were established. To increase access to postsecondary education, the province established the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), which opened in 1994, and Royal Roads University (RRU), which opened its doors in 1996. In 1995, an Aboriginal education institute - the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology - was designated as public postsecondary institution.

In 1995, the government enabled university colleges, BCIT and ECIAD, to grant undergraduate degrees. In 2003, public colleges were allowed to offer baccalaureate degrees with an applied focus, and university colleges and provincial institutes to offer master's degrees with an applied focus.

In 2002, BCcampus was established with a mandate to provide British Columbia learners with a web-based access point to online learning programs and student support services. It has created a suite of tools and services to enhance the online learning offerings of British Columbia's 25 public post-secondary institutions. BCcampus also supports collaborative approaches to distance education, making education available to all students, particularly for those in rural and remote communities and those in urban communities whose schedules demand more flexible learning opportunities.

In March 2004, government announced that it would dissolve Okanagan University College to establish a new institution in the region - Okanagan College (OC) - as well as a new university campus - University of British Columbian Okanagan (UBCO) - with the first students entering UBCO and OC in September 2005.

In March 2005, government created a new university in Kamloops - Thompson Rivers University (TRU) - to succeed the University College of the Cariboo. TRU assumed responsibility for the provincial open and distance learning mandate of the British Columbia Open University and the Open College, formerly part of the Open Learning Agency.

In 2007, the government commissioned a report on the future of British Columbia's post-secondary education system called Campus 2020: Thinking Ahead. As a result of the report's recommendations, the three remaining university colleges, Capilano College and Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design were established as teaching-intensive universities in 2008.

BC now has the following public post-secondary structure:

  • Research-intensive universities — Simon Fraser University, University of British Columbia, University of Northern British Columbia, and University of Victoria
  • Teaching-intensive universities — Capilano University, Emily Carr University of Art and Design, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, Thompson Rivers University, University of the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island University
  • Colleges — Camosun College, College of New Caledonia, College of the Rockies, Douglas College, Langara College, Okanagan College, North Island College, Northern Lights College, Northwest Community College, Selkirk College, and Vancouver Community College
  • Institutes — British Columbia Institute of Technology, Justice Institute of British Columbia, and Nicola Valley Institute of Technology

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Degree Programs

The University Act governs most of the public universities. The research-intensive universities have the mandate to provide undergraduate and graduate instruction in a wide range of disciplines and to establish facilities for the pursuit of original research. The research and scholarly activities undertaken by these universities are global in scope.

Most teaching-intensive universities offer a comprehensive range of programming, including bachelors and masters programs. Thompson Rivers University offers distance and open learning formats through Thompson Rivers University Act, Open Learning. Royal Roads University, has a mandate with specific emphasis on applied and professional programs and research activities related to labour market needs. RRU offers undergraduate and graduate programs primarily for mid-career professionals.

British Columbia's public colleges may offer four-year bachelor degrees with an applied focus. Public institutes may offer a wide variety of four-year bachelor's degrees and master's degrees with an applied focus.

While most theological institutions offer only theological degrees, two have the authority to offer academic degrees. Under the Degree Authorization Act, private and out-of-province public institutions are able to apply for ministerial consent to offer academic programs leading to the granting of a degree in British Columbia.

Non-degree programs

Most of British Columbia's teaching-intensive universities, colleges, and institutes provide, to varying degrees, adult basic education, developmental education, apprenticeship training, career, technical and vocational training, and university transfer programs to full-time and part-time learners. Programs are designed to meet the specific educational, training, and upgrading needs of individuals and local communities, and lead to certificates, diplomas, and two-year associate degrees. In 2003, legislative amendments expanded the mandate of colleges to allow them to offer baccalaureate degrees with an applied focus, and expanded the mandate of institutes to offer masters degrees with an applied focus (in addition to baccalaureate degrees). In addition, public post-secondary institutions offer a variety of credit and non-credit courses through continuing education and contract training.

Private career training institutions offer a variety of diploma and certificate programs.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Each of the province's postsecondary institutions sets its own admission requirements. Applicants are generally offered admission based on their academic qualifications, although other criteria may be used to select students for some programs.  Generally, successful graduation from high school, with the required academic prerequisites, is needed for admission to programs offered by universities, colleges, and institutes. Special consideration may be given to mature applicants.

Information about admissions and prerequisites is available from the registrar's office of each institution.

The BC Post-Secondary Application Service (formerly PASBC) assists learners seeking admission to the province's public postsecondary institutions. An electronic application form is available on the Internet, providing a common entry point to each institution's electronic application service.

Information on many of British Columbia's institutions and programs is available at http://www.educationplanner.ca.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

Tuition fees

The British Columbia government's approach to tuition fees has been to align the costs of public postsecondary education with the benefits provided, which implies appropriately sharing costs between students, institutions, government and the private sector.

Public post-secondary institutions differentiate between Canadian and international students when charging tuition fees. Tuition fee increases for Canadian students have been limited effective September 1, 2005. Under the tuition limit policy, tuition fee increases have been set at a maximum of two percent per year. A copy of the tuition limit policy is available at http://www.aved.gov.bc.ca/tuition/welcome.htm. For international students, public post-secondary institutions set their own tuition fees for courses and programs.

Information about tuition fees is provided by each institution.

Financial assistance

StudentAid BC is a comprehensive program of financial aid available to Canadian citizens, protected persons, and permanent residents who are studying at the postsecondary level. Financial aid is awarded based on calculated financial need. In addition, a variety of other programs complement the main program by providing alternate sources of funding that must be applied for individually and that have their own separate criteria for eligibility.

The main components in StudentAid BC include the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP), B.C. Student Loans (BCSL), Canada Student Grants, and the B.C. Loan Reduction Program. This comprehensive package of financial assistance ensures all British Columbians have the opportunity to access postsecondary education. Providing students with equitable and consistent access to funding reduces financial barriers to postsecondary education.

The Province administers CSLP under criteria agreed upon between the two levels of government. The provincially funded components of student financial assistance complement CSLP. Students are automatically eligible for the full range of loans and grants available through the main program at the time they submit their single StudentAid BC application.

In addition to specific bursary and grant programs, StudentAid BC provides aid under separate programs and criteria for students with permanent disabilities, students upgrading to Grade 12, and former youth in care. A number of debt management programs are available to reduce debt load and to help borrowers experiencing difficulty in repaying their student loans. Detailed information can be found on the StudentAid BC web site.

The province's postsecondary institutions administer a wide variety of scholarships and bursaries, many of which are provided through corporations, private organizations, and individual donors. Information about these awards is available from the dean of student services at each institution.

Revision: 2010-06-18


Postsecondary Education in Manitoba

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Postsecondary education in Manitoba is delivered primarily through four publicly funded universities -- including a French-language university --, one university college, two English-language colleges, and a French-language college. Four privately funded religious postsecondary institutions grant degrees in theology and/or related fields.

The University of Manitoba, the province's largest degree-granting institution and Western Canada's oldest university, has four affiliated colleges -- St. Andrew's College, St. John's College, St. Paul's College, and Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface (CUSB), the only French-language, university-level institution west of Quebec. The province's French-language college -- École technique et professionnelle -- is run by the same administrative structure as CUSB but is considered to be a separate entity for funding purposes.

In 1998, the province of Manitoba passed legislation (the Mennonite Colleges Federation Act) to create a new university (Canadian Mennonite University [CMU]). The university began operations in September 1999 and is a federation of three existing Bible colleges -- Concord College, Canadian Mennonite Bible College (CMBC), and Menno Simons College. Concord and CMBC have ceased to exist as entities, while Menno Simons College continues as a federated college of CMU. Menno Simons College has an affiliation agreement with the University of Winnipeg and the two institutions, which are located close to each other, offer joint courses.

Most of the province's postsecondary institutions are in the provincial capital of Winnipeg: the University of Manitoba and its affiliates, including CUSB; the University of Winnipeg; Red River College; École technique et professionnelle; Canadian Mennonite University and Menno Simons College; and the private degree-granting college, William and Catherine Booth College. Brandon University and Assiniboine Community College are located in the southern Manitoba community of Brandon. Assiniboine also has a satellite campus in Dauphin and regional centres in Russell and Neepawa. University College of the North [UCN] has campuses in the northern communities of The Pas and Thompson, and regional centres in Swan River, Flin Flon, and Churchill. UCN continues to offer college-level programming, and university-level programming is being added to the program offerings of the new institution over time. Two other degree-granting institutions - Providence College and Seminary and Steinbach Bible College - are located in Otterburne and Steinbach respectively. Both these colleges are private religious colleges.

Postsecondary education in Manitoba is the responsibility the Minister of Advanced Education and Literacy. However, the Council on Post-Secondary Education (COPSE) advises the minister about public universities, the university college and community colleges and is responsible for approving new programs, facilities, and services and for allocating funds to the universities, university college and colleges.

ToC / TdM History

Postsecondary education in Manitoba traces its history to a number of church-related colleges founded in the nineteenth century. In 1877, three of these colleges -- Saint Boniface, St. John's, and Manitoba College -- were brought together by government as constituent parts of the University of Manitoba. The colleges continued to offer instruction, whilst the examinations for degrees, and the granting of degrees was done by the University of Manitoba. In 1900, an act of the provincial legislature changed the university's statute to permit it to offer instruction also.

Brandon University and the University of Winnipeg also trace their histories to church-related institutions -- the former founded in 1899, the latter in 1871.

Unlike most Western provinces, where community colleges were newly created by their respective provincial governments, Manitoba's community college system grew out of three previously established vocational institutions -- the Brandon Vocational Training Centre, the Northern Manitoba Training Centre, and the Manitoba Institute of Technology. These became Assiniboine, Keewatin, and Red River community colleges respectively. Along with École technique et professionnelle, the three English-language colleges provide vocational and technical training as an alternative to university study. In 1998, Red River Community College changed its name to Red River College. In July 2004, University College of the North replaced Keewatin Community College.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and credentials offered by degree-granting institutions

The University of Manitoba offers a broad range of undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs leading to bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in more than 90 disciplines including agriculture, architecture, environmental studies, the arts and sciences, commerce, education, engineering, fine arts, human ecology, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and social work.

The University of Winnipeg, Brandon University, and Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface focus on mostly undergraduate education, but each offers limited numbers of master's programs in specialized areas. Brandon offers master's-level courses in education and rural development, and CUSB offers French-language master's courses in education and Canadian studies. The University of Winnipeg offers master's programs in family therapy; Aboriginal governance; applied computer science and society; bioscience, technology and public policy; and English with a focus on cultural studies. It also offers joint master's programs with the University of Manitoba in history, religious studies and public administration

The University College of the North offers certificates, diplomas, and undergraduate degrees in northern Manitoba. They currently offer a Bachelor of Arts, Kanácí Otinawáwasowin (Aboriginal Midwifery) Baccalaureate, and a Joint Bachelor of Nursing (with the University of Manitoba). A Bachelor of Education program is under development.

In addition to degree programs, the universities of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Brandon, and the Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface offer a variety of credit and non-credit (continuing education) diploma and certificate programs in specialized areas such as French-language proficiency, business administration, computer operations, records management, agriculture, art, and dental hygiene. The time required to complete certificate and diploma programs varies from program to program. University calendars are the best sources of information about specific program requirements.

William and Catherine Booth College, an approved teaching centre of the University of Manitoba, offers its own undergraduate arts degrees in religion, theology, and related disciplines. The Prairie Theatre Exchange offers courses in drama and theatre arts for credit at university. The University of Winnipeg and St. John?s College at the University of Manitoba also offers courses in divinity through their theology departments.

With respect to distance education, four degree-granting institutions (University of Brandon, University of Winnipeg, University of Manitoba and the University College of the North) cooperate through Inter-Universities Services, a distance education program that brings university courses to Manitoba communities north of the 53rd parallel. As well, undergraduate university study by distance education in rural and northern centres is provided through Campus Manitoba. Campus Manitoba has 17 sites in Thompson, Flin Flon, Cross Lake, The Pas, Swan River, Dauphin, Eriksdale, Southport, Deloraine, Boissevain, Killarney, Carman, Altona, Brandon, Pine Falls, Steinbach, and Whitebear, Saskatchewan. The program currently offers various courses in the arts and sciences.

Programs and credentials offered by non-degree granting institutions

The two English-language colleges - Assiniboine Community College and Red River College - offer a broad range of certificate and diploma programs, as well as apprenticeship, adult basic education, and a variety of professional and technical courses, programs which continue to be offered in University College of the North. Certificate and diploma programs can lead to careers in communication engineering, business administration, dental assisting, computer programming, radiation therapy, nursing, electronics technology, natural resources management, motor vehicle mechanics, tourism, agribusiness, and early childhood education, to name but a few.

Red River College, the largest of the above institutions, offers the widest selection of diploma, certificate programs. Certificates generally require 240 hours of instruction. Most diploma programs require two-years of full-time study, while advanced diplomas require a minimum of 600 hours of instruction and an undergraduate degree or diploma as a prerequisite for admission.

Assiniboine Community College and UCN have a heavier concentration in one-year professional technical programs than in the two-year programs, and both institutions also offer apprenticeship programs. École technique et professionnelle offers certificate and diploma programs in the French language, primarily in the areas of business administration, administrative support, and early childhood education.

Some integrated programs are provided jointly by both the colleges and the province's universities. For example, the University of Winnipeg and Red River College offer a four-year program leading to a college diploma and a bachelor of arts (in communications) or bachelor of science (in biology, chemistry, or environmental sciences) from the university. The college has similar arrangements with the University of Manitoba for teacher education programs that offer specialization in industrial arts, nursing, and business education.

Red River College has continuing education programs in four centres outside the Winnipeg area -- Arborg, Winkler, Portage la Prairie, and Steinbach. As well, the college offers courses through distance education, teleconferencing, and telephone tutoring.

Credentials that may be offered by Private Vocational Institutions in Manitoba are limited to one and two year certificates and diplomas in entry level vocational programming.

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeship is one of the longest-established methods of skill development and training. In Manitoba's apprenticeship training and certification model, an employer and an employee enter into a formal training agreement in which they agree to participate in a structured, accredited, workplace-based and technical skills training program that ultimately leads to journeyperson certification for the apprentice employee.

Through apprenticeship training, employees acquire relevant skills and knowledge while earning a wage, and employers gain highly skilled employees.

It is an industry-driven training system. The Apprenticeship and Certification Act establishes an Apprenticeship and Certification Board (the Board). The 13-member Board is appointed by the Minister of Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade to represent the interests of employees, employers and the public. The Board designates trades for apprenticeship training and trades certification. For each designated trade, the Board establishes the training and journeyperson certification standards, and-with the approval of the Minister-establishes the regulatory framework through which training and certification programs are delivered.

The Board appoints industry representatives to Provincial Trade Advisory Committees (PTACs) to provide trade-specific advice on training and certification standards, and regulation content.

The Apprenticeship Branch coordinates and facilitates the Board's regulation and program standard setting and provides other technical, administrative and financial support to the Board and the PTACs.

Operationally, the Branch administers and monitors apprentice training delivered under apprenticeship agreements and administers certification examinations. Branch staff also oversees the network of training support programs, accreditation of technical training programs, community-based training partnerships with northern and Aboriginal communities, essential skills assessment and upgrading, prior learning assessment and recognition programs, certification examination preparation workshops, and the communication and marketing of career opportunities in the skilled trades.

To become an apprentice, a person must meet basic eligibility standards (normally, high school standing or equivalent).  Persons who do not meet minimum academic standards may be able to access upgrading or prior learning assessment options in order to enter into an apprenticeship.

An employer and an employee sign an apprenticeship agreement. This agreement outlines each party's roles and responsibilities in this training arrangement. This agreement is in effect when registered with the Apprenticeship Branch. With an agreement in place, the apprentice learns the skills in his or her chosen trade by working under a certified journeyperson. The apprentice is paid a wage, which is set out in regulation, for the work performed.

About 80 per cent of the apprentice's training occurs on the job. The other 20 per cent is technical training, taken either once per year in a block of time away from the workplace or through other arrangements. The Apprenticeship Branch arranges the technical aspect of apprentices' training. Once the apprentice has completed all required levels of technical training and practical on-the-job training he or she is eligible to write a certification examination. If successful, the apprentice receives a Certificate of Qualification and becomes a certified journeyperson in the trade, with all the rights and privileges that accompany this status. In most trades, a Red Seal may be affixed to the certificate. This is acquired through the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal program and is affixed to provincial certificates of qualification of those who are successful on an interprovincial examination.

Manitoba is a member of the pan-Canadian Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program. For trades designated under the Red Seal Program, the Manitoba Certificate of Qualification bears the Red Seal endorsement. The endorsement is recognized by all Canadian jurisdictions. The holder of a Certificate of Qualification that bears a Red Seal endorsement holds a ticket to work in that trade anywhere in the country. It may not be necessary to apprentice in a trade if a person can show that he or she has significant previous experience working in the trade. In this situation, a person may challenge the examination and, if successful, acquire a Certificate of Qualifications in the trade (including a Red Seal, if applicable). There are nine compulsory certification trades in Manitoba.  All persons who wish to work in a compulsory certification trade must apprentice to become eligible to write the certification examination. The compulsory certification trades are: construction electrician, crane and hoisting equipment operator, electrologist, esthetician, hairstylist, industrial electrician, refrigeration and air conditioning mechanic, sprinkler system installer, and steamfitter/pipefitter.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Senior high school in Manitoba includes Grade 9 through Grade 12. A total of 30 credits, including a number of core requirements, are required for graduation.

Successful completion of the high school program is normally required for university entrance. The University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg require at least five credits at the senior 4 level in different subject areas, as well as certain prerequisite courses from the high school program. All universities make special provisions for mature students, who are normally at least 21 years old.

College admission requirements vary from program to program. Most certificate and diploma programs require high school graduation, and many have specific course requirements from the high school program placements. The colleges also make special provisions for mature applicants who do not meet the normal entrance requirements.

The University College of the North also makes special provision for mature applicants. Testing is often part of the process for admission to UCN.

Private vocational institutions are free to set their own admission requirements regarding educational prerequisites, though it is most common for institutions to require Grade 12 completion  in order to enrol in programming.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

Tuition in most public college and university programs was frozen at 10 per cent below 1999-2000 levels since 2000-01. In 2009-10, Government allowed a 4.5% increase in university tuition fees (which would include any ancillary fees increase) and a $100 increase for college tuition. For 2010-11, Government announced that tuition fee increases would be limited to 5% at the universities and to $150 at the colleges. In 2009-10, university tuition weighted average for Arts and Sciences was $2,963. International students may be charged an extra fee in addition to those charged to Canadian citizens and permanent residents, depending on the policies of each individual university.

On average, in 2009-10, college fees were $1,392 a year for full-time programs. International students may be charged an extra fee, depending on the program and the policies of each individual college.

The Manitoba Student Financial Assistance Program provides loans to provincial residents. The province's universities offer a variety of scholarships to students of exceptional promise.

2010-04-21


Postsecondary Education in New Brunswick

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Postsecondary education in New Brunswick is delivered through four publicly funded universities with seven campuses throughout the province; two Community Colleges constituted as Crown Corporations, with eleven campuses between them; the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design; one specialized institute (the Maritime College of Forest Technology/Collège de technologie forestière des Maritimes); a number of small, private not-for-profit denominational universities/colleges and a number of for-profit private degree granting institutions as well as various institutions that offer career-oriented training and are registered under the Private Occupational Training Act.

New Brunswick is officially bilingual, with approximately 32 per cent of the population French-speaking and 64 per cent English-speaking. The province's postsecondary education system reflects this linguistic duality. The Université de Moncton, with campuses in Moncton, Edmundston, and Shippagan, is the largest French-language university in North America outside the province of Quebec, while the other three public universities are primarily English-speaking. Five of the province's eleven community college campuses offer programming in French, the other six in English.

The Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour is responsible for postsecondary education in the province. The Department administers university policy through the Post-Secondary Affairs Branch, as well as student financial assistance for postsecondary students in all sectors through the Student Financial Services Branch. The Department also oversees community college policy for the New Brunswick Community College (NBCC) and le Collège communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick (CCNB), and is responsible for the Private Occupational Training Act, under which private trainers must register, as well as for private for-profit universities operating under the Degree Granting Act.

ToC / TdM History

Postsecondary education in New Brunswick traces its history to the Academy of Arts and Science, founded in 1785, a forerunner to the University of New Brunswick. Today, the University of New Brunswick, with campuses in Fredericton and Saint John, offers a wide range of degree programs at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels. Nearly half of all university students in the province attend this institution, and the majority of research in the province is undertaken there as well. Both Mount Allison University, founded in Sackville in 1840, and St. Thomas University, founded in 1910 in Chatham and which now shares a campus with the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, are primarily undergraduate institutions. The Université de Moncton was established in 1963; it traces its roots to the former Collège Saint-Joseph in Memramcook near Moncton. In the 1970s, classical colleges in Edmundston and Shippagan were absorbed into the Université de Moncton system. It, like the University of New Brunswick, offers a full range of programs and degree levels but in the French language and engages in a considerable amount of research activity.

Vocational schools had a comparatively early beginning in New Brunswick. The Carleton County Vocational School, for example, which today is the Woodstock campus of the New Brunswick Community College, was founded in 1919. The Vocational Training Centre, now the college's Moncton campus, was founded shortly after World War II to provide educational training to returning war veterans. The New Brunswick Community College was created by an act of the provincial legislature in 1973. Existing technology institutes, training centers, and the Carleton County Vocational School were incorporated into the new college system. In 2010, the college system was re-organized into two separate Crown Corporation structures, with NBCC being designated as the English-language College, and CCNB as the French-language College. With campuses throughout the province, the two Colleges are designed to respond to the need for non-university, postsecondary programming aimed at skills training and human resource development. The New Brunswick College of Craft and Design was founded by the provincial government in 1938 and is operated today by the Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour.

Other specialized schools include the Maritime College of Forest Technology, established in 1946 and located in Fredericton, NB. Started in 1980 and located in Bathurst, NB, the Collège de technologie forestière des Maritimes offers an equivalent Francophone program.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and credentials offered by degree-granting institutions

The University of New Brunswick is the largest degree-granting institution in the province and offers a broad range of undergraduate programs, as well as graduate degrees in areas such as arts, science, engineering, forestry, business, and computer science. It also provides pre-medicine and pre-dentistry programs. Dalhousie University, in Nova Scotia, is the only university in Maritime Canada to offer degrees in these fields, and has partnered with the University of New Brunswick to deliver a delocalized undergraduate medical education program in Saint John.

The Université de Moncton, like the University of New Brunswick, offers a wide variety of undergraduate and graduate programs. In addition, Université de Moncton offers various one-year certificate programs and two-year diploma programs in fields such as management, marketing, public administration, and language studies. It also collaborates with the l'Université de Sherbrooke (Province of Quebec) which delivers a delocalized undergraduate medical education program in Moncton.

Mount Allison University and St. Thomas University specialize in undergraduate education. These institutions also offer one- and two-year certificate programs in various specialized fields.

Undergraduate programs generally require four years of full-time study, but there are some important exceptions. At both the Université de Moncton and the University of New Brunswick, for example engineering requires five years of full-time study for an undergraduate degree. A bachelor of laws degree requires three years of study beyond a first baccalaureate degree. A bachelor's degree in education requires five years of full time study, which includes a degree in a fundamental field coupled with further studies in education.

An undergraduate honours degree, available at most universities in most disciplines, generally requires a higher level of concentration in the honours subject and a higher level of academic standing. It, too, requires four years of full-time study and is often required for entrance to graduate studies.

All four New Brunswick universities are engaged in distance education programs, using telecommunications technology and on-site instruction to reach communities throughout the province.

Three private universities with religious affiliation are granted the right to give degrees through acts of the New Brunswick Legislature: Crandall University, Saint Stephen University, and Kingswood University.

In 2001, the Degree Granting Act was proclaimed, which outlines the procedures to be followed by private institutions to issue degree credentials. There are currently two institutions designated to offer specific degrees through that legislation. They include Yorkville University, and the University of Fredericton.

Programs and credentials offered by non-degree granting institutions

NBCC and CCNB offer two-year diploma programs and one-year certificate programs in a wide range of career-oriented fields such as agribusiness, allied health technologies, business technology, civil engineering technology, communication arts, electronics engineering technology, hospitality and tourism, marine engineering, practical nursing, skilled trades, and youth care. In addition, they provide programs in academic upgrading and a wide range of short-term, specialized courses often aimed at meeting the needs of a specific industry or sector.

Diploma programs typically require 80 weeks of instruction; or a minimum of 45 credits; certificates typically require 32 - 40 weeks, or a minimum of 10 or more credits. Students who take part in programs of less than 10 credits or 15 weeks may obtain a certificate of achievement if their work is evaluated. For short programs where there is no evaluation, students can obtain a certificate of participation.

NBCC has campuses in Fredericton, Miramichi, Moncton, Saint John, St. Andrews, and Woodstock, while CCNB has campuses in Bathurst, Campbellton, Dieppe, Edmundston, and la Péninsule acadienne. Each campus tends to specialize in a particular area, and a few programs are only available in one of the two official languages. In addition, the Colleges provide distance learning opportunities to remote communities through multi-media telecommunications technologies and correspondence courses to allow students to study in their homes.

Students entering the community college system may apply for academic credit for previous education and work experience, including, in some instances, vocational skills acquired in high school.

The New Brunswick College of Craft and Design offers a one-year Certificate - Foundation Visual Arts, a two-year Diploma - Fine Craft and Applied Arts, a four-year Bachelor of Applied Arts offered in partnership with the University of New Brunswick, a one-year Diploma of Advanced Studies - Visual Arts and a Certificate of Achievement acquired through completion of certain credit courses. Studio disciplines include Ceramics, Communication Design, Fashion Design, Jewellery/Metal Arts, Photography and Textiles.

The Maritime College of Forest Technology offers a two-year program (September to April semesters) plus a summer work practicum in Forest Technology. The College has always seen its role as one of preparing students to work in the forest industry, not just with education but also teaching responsibility and leadership. Many graduates are hired by the forest industry starting out in supervisory roles and graduates are sought by employers throughout North America. The Collège de Technologie forestière des Maritimes offers an equivalent Francophone program.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

As a bilingual province, New Brunswick operates two school systems - one English, one French - with slightly different curricula and graduation requirements. In both systems, senior high school incorporates grades 9/10 through 12, and students graduate with a high school diploma.

Successful completion of secondary school with specific "academic" level courses (N.B. Level 1 or 2) is the minimum requirement for admission to the province's four universities

NBCC and CCNB require high school graduation or its equivalent for entry into its diploma and certificate programs, although some programs have specific course requirements. Adult learners who have not completed high school can enter academic upgrading and may acquire a high school equivalency diploma (i.e., GED) or a N. B. Adult High School Diploma.

Universities and the Colleges have special provisions for admitting mature applicants who are 21 years of age or older

The New Brunswick College of Craft and Design and the Maritime College of Forest Technology require a high school diploma for admission, although both institutions have provisions for accepting students who have not completed the high school program.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

In 2009-10, full-time undergraduate tuition/compulsory fees at the province's four universities ranged from $4,570 at St. Thomas University to $6,720 at Mount Allison University. Most universities charge additional differential fees for international students, which vary from institution to institution.

In 2009-10, tuition fees for most full-time programs within the community college system were $2,600 per year, the major exception being adult basic education programs where the fees were $130. International students pay $5,200 per year.

Tuition at the Maritime College of Forest Technology is $4,000 for each year of the two-year diploma program.

The Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour has responsibility to administer New Brunswick student loans and bursaries, which supplement federal Canada Student Loans and targeted grants for Canadian citizens and permanent residents. Student Financial Services Branch also administers the Timely Completion Benefit, a program designed to reduce student loan debt for graduates who complete their studies within the established timeline of their program. A Repayment Assistance Plan is available to student loan borrowers having difficulty in repaying their loans.

The province offers The New Brunswick Tuition Rebate program which is a rebate of provincial income taxes paid, equal to 50% of the tuition costs at eligible post-secondary institutions with a maximum lifetime rebate of $20,000.

Each of the universities and the Colleges offer a variety of scholarship programs for students in financial need and/or of exceptional academic merit.

Revision: 2010-06-02


Postsecondary Education in Newfoundland and Labrador

ToC / TdM Provincial overview

The public postsecondary education system in Newfoundland and Labrador consists of Memorial University of Newfoundland and College of the North Atlantic. Memorial University includes the main campus and the Marine Institute, both in St. John's; Sir Wilfred Grenfell College in Corner Brook; the Labrador Institute in Happy Valley-Goose Bay; a residential campus in Harlow, England; and the Institut Frecker on the neighbouring French island of St. Pierre.

Memorial University (2009) enrolls 17,604 undergraduate and graduate students and conducts award-winning research in oceans, health, natural resources, energy and the environment, culture and heritage, and other areas. Consequently, Memorial has outpaced the other top 50 Canadian research universities in research funding growth, with an increase of 117% over the five years from 2002-07. Memorial's external research support totaled over $90 million in 2008-09.

The continued growth of Memorial University's graduate program enhances its research and development capacity and that of the province. The number of graduate students enrolled at Memorial University has grown from 1,608 in 1999 to 2,673 in 2009, a 66% increase. To support this growth, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador allocated an additional $1 million for Graduate School Fellowships in 2009 and an additional $2 million in 2010. Some examples of graduate research and activities include: a multimillion dollar project to develop a new drill-bit design to improve oil and gas industry productivity; the first paper in the field of obesity research to discuss using weight gain instead of weight loss in genetic research; and the first research program in North America with a focus on “green” process engineering.

College of the North Atlantic is the province's public college, enrolling 6,745 in 2009. It is one of the largest non-university postsecondary educational and skills-training institutions in Atlantic Canada. It operates 17 campuses across the province and a campus in the Middle East State of Qatar.

College of the North Atlantic also contributes to the research and development activities of the province. Current projects include: wave-powered pumping of seawater for onshore use and electrical generation in Burin; development of wireless technology at Seal Cove for oil and gas industry applications; geospatial research in Corner Brook for assessment of provincial terrestrial resources; a manufacturing technology centre to help the province's manufacturers access applied research and advanced technological capabilities; and an agricultural training and research centre to support the province's agriculture industry.

The Council on Higher Education promotes collaboration in this public postsecondary education system by providing recommendations to Memorial University, College of the North Atlantic and the Minister of Advanced Education and Skills on shared program areas. The Council also compiles an annual transfer guide that includes transfer of credit arrangements for courses and programs within the provincial postsecondary system.

The Council was originally established in 1992. In 2005, the province released Foundations for Success: White Paper on Public Post-Secondary Education. This policy document was commissioned as part of government's continued commitment to provide affordable and accessible postsecondary education opportunities. In light of the recommendations put forth in the White Paper, a reconfigured council was recognized in legislation through the Council on Higher Education Act which was proclaimed January 26, 2007.

Private training institutions (PTIs) have operated in the province for more than 35 years. Today, 25 institutions offer a wide variety of employment-oriented training programs on a user-pay and sponsored basis. Over 3,000 students were enrolled at PTIs in 2009 in a variety of programs such as apprenticeship training (including industrial trades), business, health sciences and information technology.

ToC / TdM History

Memorial University was founded in 1925 (as Memorial University College), and achieved degree-granting status in 1949, the year the province entered Confederation. The university grew rapidly during the 1970s. Program offerings expanded, especially in the areas of ocean and marine sciences, and another campus -- Sir Wilfred Grenfell College -- was opened in Corner Brook in 1975.

The Marine Institute was founded in 1964 as the College of Fisheries, Navigation, Marine Engineering, and Electronics. It became part of Memorial University in 1992, and today offers diploma, certificate and degree programs in areas such as aquaculture, fishing technology, marine engineering, ocean technology and maritime studies.

Today, Memorial University's six faculties and nine schools offer a wide variety of degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The province's vocational school system was established in 1963 with nine schools located throughout the province. Six more schools were added to the system in 1972. The schools provided pre-employment training in the traditional trades, as well as academic upgrading.

In 1985, the vocational school system was reorganized into a provincial public college system that included three institutes and five colleges with a total of 22 campuses across the province. In 1992, this system was merged into five regional colleges with similar mandates. In 1996, a further refinement of the system resulted in College of the North Atlantic. College of the North Atlantic offers programs in Applied Arts, Business Studies, Health Studies, Engineering Technology, Industrial Trades, Tourism and Natural Resources and Information Technology.

ToC / TdM Programs and credentials offered

Programs and credentials offered by degree-granting institutions

Memorial University of Newfoundland offers a full range of programs leading to degrees at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels. Memorial's campus in Corner Brook, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, offers bachelor's degree programs in arts, science, fine arts, business administration, education and provides support services to the Western Regional School of Nursing.

Most bachelor's degrees require four years of full-time study. Other undergraduate degrees (in social work, education, or engineering, for example) require five years of full-time study. Honours degrees generally require a higher level of concentration in the honours subject, as well as a higher level of academic performance, and are often prerequisites for study at the master's level.

Memorial University is celebrating the 40th anniversary of its distance education and learning technology initiatives. Distance education programs allow Memorial University to reach potential students nationally, internationally, and throughout the province, including those living in rural and remote communities. A variety of credit and non-credit courses are available on-line including more than 350 credit courses to complete degree programs from 10 faculties and schools. In 2007, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador committed $1.5 million for distance education. To date, this commitment has allowed the development of 62 new courses, with further courses in development. Since 2007, Memorial University has also developed an additional 61 courses using existing university resources.

Memorial University has also partnered with College of the North Atlantic, the Centre for Distance Learning and Innovation and Desire2Learn and implemented a new learning management system for use in distance education and on-campus courses at both institutions. This partnership has been recognized by the Canadian Network for Innovation in Education with the 2010 national Award for Excellence and Innovation in Partnership and Collaboration. This award recognizes initiatives that contribute to supporting open and distance education within the primary, secondary and postsecondary sectors.

As part of Memorial University, the Marine Institute provides training in areas of fisheries and oceans, and marine technology. Degree programs include a bachelor of maritime studies, bachelor of technology, a master of marine studies (fisheries resource management), master of technology management and master of maritime management. These programs cater to students seeking careers in the marine transportation and aquaculture industries respectively.

The Marine Institute also offers one-year advanced diploma programs, three-year diploma of technology programs, two-year technical diploma programs and one-year or less technical and vocational certificate programs. It also offers shorter programs, such as industrial response and professional development training programs, on a regular basis.

Programs and credentials offered by non-degree granting institutions

College of the North Atlantic delivers educational services throughout the province and offers over 100 full-time diploma and certificate programs in Academics and Applied Arts, Business and Information Technology, Engineering Technology, Health Sciences, Industrial Education/Trades and Tourism and Natural Resources. College of the North Atlantic also offers a full range of more than 300 part-time courses and apprenticeship training.

  • Two- and three-year programs leading to a diploma;
  • Full-time occupational courses leading to a certificate;
  • Adult Basic Education and academic upgrading programs;
  • Career enhancement and personal development programs;
  • Courses conducted in formal institutional settings, and courses delivered in communities to meet local needs;
  • Various skills training programs funded through the federal Department of Human Resources and Skills Development (HRSDC); the administration of this funding devolved to the province in 2009.
  • Applied research and technology transfer;
  • Courses conducted in partnership with other publicly funded institutions, community agencies, and the private sector;
  • Special interest, hobby, and craft courses offered in the evenings, part-time, or in workshops.

College of the North Atlantic's Distributed Learning Service serves remote learners throughout the province, across Canada and internationally. Distributed Learning course offerings and enrolment grew by approximately 9% in 2009, with over 300 courses and 4,714 course enrolments. Distributed Learning continues to support student enrolment from nearly 400 Newfoundland and Labrador communities, every Canadian province and territory, and international locations including Qatar.

There are 25 private training institutions (PTIs) offering postsecondary education in the province, the majority of which are located on the Avalon Peninsula. Currently, PTIs offer a wide variety of programs, approved by the Department of Advanced Education and Skills, both on a user-pay and sponsored basis in information technology, health sciences, business and apprenticeship training (including industrial trades). PTIs are governed by the Private Training Institutions Act and Regulations. PTIs may also have credit transfer agreements with other institutions (e.g., colleges and universities) outside the province.

Apprenticeship programs are offered through PTIs and College of the North Atlantic. Apprenticeship training in Newfoundland and Labrador is composed of a combination of Red Seal and provincially designated trades. Most apprenticeship training programs involve entry-level training, followed by on-the-job training interspaced with additional classroom training. Most programs are four years in duration. Apprenticeable trades training (including certification) offered in Newfoundland and Labrador includes:

  • Automotive Service Technician
  • Blaster (provincial designation only)
  • Boilermaker
  • Boom Truck Operator (provincial designation only)
  • Bricklayer
  • Cabinetmaker
  • Carpenter
  • Concrete Finisher
  • Construction Electrician
  • Cook
  • Hairstylist
  • Heavy Duty Equipment Technician
  • Heavy Equipment Operator (provincial designation only)
  • Industrial Electrician
  • Industrial Mechanic (Millwright)
  • Instrumentation and Control Technician
  • Insulator (Heat and Frost)
  • Ironworker (Generalist)
  • Lather (Interior Systems Mechanic)
  • Machinist
  • Metal Fabricator (Fitter)
  • Mobile Crane Operator
  • Motor Vehicle Body Repairer (Metal and Paint)
  • Oil Heat System Technician
  • Painter and Decorator
  • Plumber
  • Powerline Technician (operating)
  • Powerline Technician (construction) (provincial designation only)
  • Power Systems Operator (provincial designation only)
  • Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic
  • Residential Electrician (provincial designation only)
  • Roofer
  • Sheet Metal Worker
  • Small Equipment Repair Technician (provincial designation only)
  • Sprinkler System Installer
  • Steamfitter/Pipefitter
  • Stonemason (provincial designation only)
  • Truck and Transport Mechanic
  • Welder

For further information, visit http://www.aes.gov.nl.ca/app/.

Not all programs are offered at all College of the North Atlantic campuses or PTIs. Students are advised to contact College of the North Atlantic or PTI for further information.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Newfoundland and Labrador's secondary school curriculum includes three years of intermediate school and three years of senior high school -- levels 1 through 3 -- leading to a provincial high school diploma.

For admission into undergraduate programs, Memorial University requires provincial students to complete the high school graduation requirements set by the Department of Advanced Education and Skills and to obtain two credits in English, academic or advanced mathematics, laboratory science, social science/modern or classical language, and electives, with an overall average of 70 percent or above in courses at the 3000 level. Mature applicants over the age of 21, who have not fulfilled these requirements, may be admitted to the university with the approval of the university's committee on admissions. Different requirements exist for lifelong learning and graduate programs. Applicants are advised to contact the Registrar's Office, Memorial University, for further information (http://www.mun.ca/regoff).

Admission requirements to the Marine Institute vary from program to program. Diploma programs generally require high school graduation with a minimum average of 60 percent in level three mathematics, language, and science. Certificate programs require high school graduation or the equivalent. Advanced diploma programs require successful completion of a three-year diploma program or a university degree. Applicants who do not meet the regular requirements, but who are at least 21 years of age, may be admitted as mature students. Applicants are advised to contact the Marine Institute for further information (www.mi.mun.ca or admissions@mi.mun.ca) Marine Institute degree programs are governed by Memorial University regulations. Applicants are advised to contact Memorial's Registrar's Office for further information (www.mun.ca/regoff).

It is the policy of College of the North Atlantic to maintain an ‘open admission policy'. Students are admitted into a program on a first-come first-serve basis as assessed by the date of receipt of their application and on the proviso that the candidate student meets the minimum qualifications prescribed. Admission requirements to the College varies from program to program. Certificate programs usually require high school graduation or the equivalent. Diploma programs usually require high school graduation or the equivalent, and an overall average of at least 60 percent on specific level three courses. Applicants who do not meet these requirements, but who are at least 19 years old, can apply in writing for admission as mature students. Applicants are advised to contact the College for further information (info@cna.nl.ca or 1-888-982-2268 (North America only)).

PTIs offer a variety of programs with varying admissions requirements. Applicants are advised to contact the appropriate PTI for further information on their admissions requirements.

ToC / TdM Tuition and financial assistance

Between 2001-02 and 2003-04, Newfoundland and Labrador was the only province to reduce university tuition fees. Since that time a tuition freeze has been in place. Tuition at Memorial University is the lowest in Atlantic Canada and, with the exception of the rate in Quebec for Quebec residents only, the lowest of any province.

For 2010-11, full-time undergraduate tuition fees at Memorial University are $2,550 for 30 credit-hours. International students are required to pay $8,800 for 30 credit-hours.

At the Marine Institute, fees for technician and diploma of technology courses are $173 per course; maximum $690 per term. International students are charged $865 per course; maximum $3,450 per term. For advanced diploma programs, tuition is $345 per course; maximum $1,380 per term. International students are charged $1,730 per course to a maximum of $6,900 per term.

At College of the North Atlantic, fees have been set at $1,452/year since 1998/99. The same fees applied to sponsored refugees, but tuition for most international students is set on a cost-recovery basis.

PTIs in Newfoundland and Labrador are responsible for setting their own tuition fees. Tuition rates at PTIs vary by institution and program and applicants are advised to contact individual PTIs for information on tuition and scholarship opportunities.

The provincial government operates a student financial assistance program for provincial residents to supplement the Canada Student Loans Program. Highlights of Newfoundland and Labrador's student financial assistance include an up-front, needs-based grant, the Debt Reduction Grant and the elimination of interest on the provincial component of student loans. A number of scholarships and bursaries are also available to provincial residents through Memorial University, College of the North Atlantic and various private institutions. Applicants should contact Memorial University's scholarships and awards office at (709) 737-3956 or email scholarships@mun.ca for information. For more information on College of the North Atlantic's scholarships and awards, applicants visit www.cna.nl.ca/fstudents/awards.asp or call 1-888-982-2268 (North America only).

2010-06-02


Postsecondary Education in the Northwest Territories

ToC / TdM Territorial Overview

Postsecondary education in the Northwest Territories is delivered through Aurora College, a publicly funded college headquartered at Fort Smith.

Aurora College has three campuses -- Thebacha (Fort Smith), Yellowknife, and Aurora (Inuvik) -- as well as a network of 23 community learning centres throughout the territory.

In addition to providing university-level transfer, certificate, and diploma programs, Aurora College provides adult education and literacy programs, skills development programs, trades training, educational assessment, and counselling.

The territorial Department of Education, Culture and Employment has responsibility for postsecondary education.

ToC / TdM History

Adult and vocational education had formal but limited beginnings in the early 1960s. In 1964, the Apprentice Training and Occupational Certification Program was established. Impetus was given to the adult education program in 1966 with the start-up of an adult housing education project. The first program designed to train Aboriginal teachers in the Northwest Territories began in 1968.

In 1969, responsibility for education was transferred from the federal government to the territories' new Department of Education. That same year, the Adult Vocational Training Centre was established at Fort Smith. This centre provided a range of academic upgrading and trades programs. Over the years, offerings expanded to include certificate and diploma-level programs. The centre was renamed Thebacha College in 1981. Following extensive public consultation, the approach to territorial postsecondary education changed in the mid-1980s. A decentralized system of six regional campuses was established as the Arctic College under the Arctic College Act. By 1990, community learning centres across the NWT had joined the college system.

In January 1995, Arctic College was divided into two colleges -- Aurora College serving the western part of the territories and Nunavut Arctic College serving the east; in 1999 the eastern Arctic became Nunavut.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Aurora College offers a variety of certificate, diploma, trades, and university transfer programs in areas such as office administration, business administration, health and human services, nursing, social work, teacher education, environment and natural resources technology, apprenticeship trades, and underground miner training.

Programs vary in length from eight weeks (apprenticeship programs) to four years, but, generally speaking, certificate and university transfer programs involve one year of full-time studies, and most diploma programs, two years. The teacher education diploma requires three years, and in 2007 the college began offering fourth year delivery of a four-year University of Saskatchewan B. Ed at Thebacha campus. The college delivers a four-year B.Sc in nursing degree through British Columbia's Collaborative Nursing Project, University of Victoria. In addition, the college provides adult basic education, skills development courses, pre-trades training, and contract training on behalf of local employers. As well, the college has established assessment and recognition processes to allow students to apply for course credits for previous learning and work experience.

Aurora College has transfer agreements with a number of institutions in southern Canada, including the University of Alberta, Athabasca University, the University of Regina, the University of Calgary, the University of Lethbridge, Lakehead University, the University of Northern British Columbia, and the University of Saskatchewan. Aurora College is also a founding member of the University of the Arctic.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Senior high school in the Northwest Territories includes grades 10 through 12 and is modelled on the system in Alberta. High school graduation is normally required for most university-level programs at the college, but, since admission requirements vary from program to program, it is best to consult the college calendar for details. Special consideration is given to mature applicants who are at least 17 years old and who have been out of school for a least a year. The college has an open admissions policy for students pursuing adult basic education and skills development courses.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

In 2009-2010, full-time tuition fees for certificate and diploma programs at the college were $1,200 per semester ($245 per course for up to two courses). Tuition fees for short career development and personal development courses reflect the actual costs of the course. There are no differential fees for foreign students.

The government of the Northwest Territories administers a student financial assistance program for territorial residents.

Revised: 2010-10-08


Postsecondary Education in Nova Scotia

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Postsecondary education in Nova Scotia is delivered through 11 publicly supported degree-granting institutions and one province-wide community college — the Nova Scotia Community College.

Some of the province's degree-granting institutions are highly specialized; others offer a broader range of undergraduate and graduate programs. The latter include six English-language universities - Acadia University, Cape Breton University, Dalhousie University, Mount Saint Vincent University, Saint Mary's University, and St. Francis Xavier University — and one French-language university college, Université Sainte-Anne, which provides a comprehensive range of educational opportunities in French at both the college and university levels.

The province's oldest university, the University of King's College, is affiliated with Dalhousie and holds most of its degree-granting powers in abeyance, the exception being the degree in journalism not available at Dalhousie. The Atlantic School of Theology (AST) is an ecumenical graduate school that prepares women and men for a variety of ministries, both lay and ordained. The Nova Scotia College of Art and Design prepares students to enter professional life as artists, communication designers, and art educators. Since its foundation in 1905 as a small, regional school of agriculture, the Nova Scotia Agricultural College has evolved to become Atlantic Canada's agricultural teaching and research institution.

The Nova Scotia Community College provides a province-wide system of training and education. Physically located on 13 campuses and a number of learning centres, the NSCC offers certificate, diploma, and post-diploma programs throughout five academic schools that serve key sectors of the economy: applied arts and new media, business, health and human services, trades and technology, and access. As well as receiving classroom training, students have the opportunity to take apprenticeship courses, safety training, and regular college programs through the Internet.

Both the Nova Scotia Community College and the Université Sainte-Anne provide customized college-level programming to meet the human resources development needs of a variety of businesses, organizations, and government departments. Additionally, they support access to higher education by providing academic upgrading to those requiring high school completion.

The Department of Education is responsible for the province's postsecondary system.

ToC / TdM History

The number and diversity of Nova Scotia's postsecondary institutions reflect the cultural, linguistic, and religious diversity of the province's early European settlers. The University of King's College was established in 1789 by United Empire Loyalists who settled in Nova Scotia after fleeing the rebelling colonies to the south. King's was modeled on Oxford University in England and was designed to reinforce British and Anglican traditions and values. In 1818, Lieutenant Governor Lord Dalhousie created a new institution, the future Dalhousie University, along the lines of the University of Edinburgh, to counter the religious restrictions and elitism he found at King's.

Other universities, most with denominational affiliations, were created throughout the nineteenth century. Acadia University was established by the Baptists in 1838. The province's Irish, Scottish, and French Roman Catholic communities founded Saint Mary's University, St. Francis Xavier University, and Université Sainte-Anne in 1841, 1853, and 1890 respectively.

Mount Saint Vincent was started as an academy by the Sisters of Charity in 1873. The original purpose was to train novices and sisters as teachers, but the Mount soon evolved into an independent women's university providing higher education for other women. In 1966 a new charter changed the Mount's name from Mount Saint Vincent College to Mount Saint Vincent University. Male students were first admitted in 1967, and today women still represent the majority of the enrolment. Almost half of the students attend part-time.

The Atlantic School of Theology (AST) was founded in 1971 and is the result of the amalgamation of three faculties (Anglican, Roman Catholic, and United Church of Canada) into one ecumenical school to serve the Atlantic Region. Other Christian denominations are also represented. In March 2002, AST and Saint Mary's University signed a memorandum of agreement affiliating the two institutions.

The Nova Scotia College of Art and Design was founded in 1887 by Anna Leonowens as an artistic enterprise to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. The university did not receive degree-granting status until 1969.

The Nova Scotia Agricultural College was established in 1905 as a small, regional school of agriculture and has evolved to become Atlantic Canada's agricultural teaching and research institution.

The Technical University of Nova Scotia, which traced its history to 1907, was amalgamated with Dalhousie University in April 1997.

The Nova Scotia Community College was established in 1988 as a result of merging the existing vocational and technical institutions in the province. Collège de l'Acadie was also established in 1988 to provide training in the French language for Nova Scotia's Acadian/French population. In 2002, Collège de l'Acadie merged with Université Sainte-Anne and is now one university college institution — Université Sainte-Anne.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and credentials offered by degree-granting institutions

General undergraduate degrees at most universities in Nova Scotia require three years of full-time study. Honours degrees, involving a higher level of concentration in the honours discipline and a higher level of academic performance, generally require four years of full-time study. Most universities also offer diploma and certificate programs in various specialized fields. These vary in length depending on the program and the institution. University calendars are the best sources of information about specific program requirements.

Dalhousie University is the province's largest degree-granting institution and the largest university in Maritime Canada. It offers a full range of graduate and professional programs, including medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, engineering, computer science, and law. Graduate programs, especially at the master's level, are also available at other universities in the province, although most institutions tend to specialize.

Most universities in the province offer part-time and summer session programs and a number are actively involved in distance education.

Programs and credentials offered by non-degree-granting institutions

The Nova Scotia Community College offers a wide variety of certificate (one academic year of study), diploma (two academic years of study), and advanced or post-diploma programs (usually one academic year) in career-oriented fields such as health sciences, digital multimedia, skilled trades, geosciences, business, and much more. NSCC offers students an alternative means of course delivery through NSCC Online Learning, a college resource. In 2001, approximately 5,000 students accessed NSCC's apprenticeship, college core, and safety training programs and courses through NSCC on-line learning.

Université Sainte-Anne is a recognized postsecondary collegial institution, which uses technology to deliver training programs developed to meet the needs of the Acadian/Francophone population in Nova Scotia. The university college's learning centres are equipped with distance education/videoconference systems. Course delivery is also available through the Internet. The institution offers numerous types of courses and programs, full-time and part-time postsecondary education programs, customized and professional training programs, academic upgrading, evening and weekend courses, and correspondence courses. It also offers academic upgrading, which allows mature students to obtain their high school diploma equivalency.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Generally speaking, universities require high school completion from a university preparatory program. Most universities have minimum grade point average requirements, and some have specific course requirements, depending on the university program to which the student is seeking admission. Most universities are willing to make special provisions for mature applicants over the age of 25 who have not completed high school. Additional information on admission requirements for universities and colleges is available on the Web.

The Nova Scotia Community College requires high school completion, or equivalencies, for admission to its programs. Students who have not completed high school may enrol in the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning, which provides delivery of adult education programs from basic literacy to high school completion. NSCC designates seats for Mi'kmaq and African Nova Scotians in each of its core programs. Admission requirements at Université Sainte-Anne are similar to those of the Nova Scotia Community College.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

In 2010-11, full-time undergraduate arts tuition fees at Nova Scotia universities for Nova Scotia residents ranged from about $3,927 to $5,369, depending on the institution. Out-of-province students have a differential fee and for 2010-11 the average arts tuition is $6,152 compared to $5,130 for Nova Scotia residents. Foreign tuition fees at the university level range from about $5,954 to $14,100, depending on the institution and program of study. Students should consult the campus of their choice for details on tuition, residence, and other fees charged for student-related services.

In the 2010-11 academic year, tuition for core programs at NSCC was $2,700.

The provincial government operates a student assistance program for residents of the province to supplement the Canada Student Loans Program. A number of scholarships and bursaries are available through the universities and private agencies.

Students should consult the campus of their choice for details on fees and financial assistance.

Revision: 2011-01-04


Postsecondary Education in Ontario

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Postsecondary education in Ontario is delivered through 19 publicly assisted universities and their affiliates; 24 publicly assisted colleges of applied arts and technology; three agricultural colleges affiliated to a university and a school of horticulture; one applied health science institute; 17 privately funded institutions with restricted degree-granting authority; the federally funded Royal Military College; about 570 registered private career colleges; and many more non-degree-granting private institutions offering postsecondary education or training that do not have regulatory oversight in the province (e.g., language programs, programs less than 40 hours in length, programs costing less than $1,000, professional development programs, single-skill training programs). There are also a number of private and out-of-province public institutions that have the consent of the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities to offer specified degree programs in Ontario.

Universities offer degree programs in the arts and sciences, graduate and professional programs, as well as continuing-education programs and certificates, including distance and part-time programs.

Most publicly assisted universities offer both undergraduate and graduate degree programs, although some, such as Brock, Nipissing, and Trent, tend to focus on undergraduate education. Two universities, Laurentian and Ottawa, offer programs in both English and French. As well, York University's Glendon College offers liberal-arts programs in French.

In addition, there are two specialized institutions that operate at the university level — the Collège dominicain de philosophie et de théologie, which is provincially funded, and the Ontario College of Art and Design, which is authorized to grant degrees in design and fine arts, and is treated as part of the university sector for funding purposes.

Privately funded and out-of-province degree-granting institutions are authorized under the Post-secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000, to advertise and offer a degree program or part of a program leading to a degree.

Ontario's 24 colleges of applied arts and technology offer certificate and diploma programs in business, applied arts, community and social services, technology, and health sciences, as well as offering degrees in applied areas of study. They also offer part-time, distance-education, and continuing-education courses; apprenticeship training; and skills-training programs that provide students with the opportunity to develop skills for careers in a field of their choice. Two of the colleges, Collège Boréal and La Cité collégiale, offer programming in French.

The colleges offer hundreds of full-time and part-time career-oriented programs for secondary-school graduates and mature students. Most college programs fall into two categories — two- and three-year diploma programs or certificate programs requiring one year of study or less. Recently, colleges have begun offering baccalaureate degrees in applied areas of study.

Although college programming across the province has much in common, individual colleges have established areas of specialization. The program in natural resources at Sir Sandford Fleming's Lindsay campus and the internationally recognized animation program at Sheridan College are examples of the diversity and range of programs offered within the system.

The province's three agricultural colleges affiliated with the University of Guelph (Collège d'Alfred, Kemptville College, and the Ridgetown College of Agricultural Technology) and the Niagara Parks Commission School of Horticulture offer various diploma and certificate programs of one, two, and three years' duration.

The Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, offers various three-year diploma programs in health technologies, in cooperation with more than 60 hospitals.

A number of privately funded institutions have been given statutory authority to grant degrees in restricted areas, mostly in religious education.

Private career colleges (PCCs) are independent organizations that offer certificate and diploma programs in a variety of fields. PCCs must be registered and have their programs approved by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

Postsecondary education in Ontario is the responsibility of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, made up of university deans of graduate studies, appraises new graduate programs prior to their review by the ministry. The College Compensation and Appointments Council appoints the external members to college boards of governors and acts as the bargaining agent for college management in collective bargaining. The Student Support Branch oversees private career colleges that require registration in Ontario.

ToC / TdM History

Postsecondary education in Ontario traces its history to the establishment of King's College, the future University of Toronto, in 1827. Other institutions founded in the 19th century include Queen's University, established by the Presbyterian Church in 1841; the University of Ottawa, established as the College of Bytown in 1848; and the University of Western Ontario, formerly the Western University of London, founded in 1878.

Like most of Ontario's early universities, King's College had strong religious affiliations. However, in 1849, it became the first provincially chartered, non-sectarian university in the province. Three denominational institutions — Victoria, St. Michael's, and Trinity — became affiliated with the public university after the province withdrew financial support from church-related universities in 1868.

This model was repeated in the 20th century when most church-related institutions either dropped their religious affiliations or sought federation agreements with public institutions in order to obtain provincial funding. Examples include Queen's University, which severed its ties with the Presbyterian Church in 1912; Assumption University, which became the University of Windsor in 1963; Waterloo Lutheran University, which became Wilfrid Laurier University in 1973; and the University of Ottawa, which dropped its religious affiliation in 1965 and transferred theology and canon-law studies to its affiliate, Saint Paul University.

Returning veterans from World War II had a profound impact on universities in Ontario, placing unprecedented levels of demand on the province's limited education system. Carleton University was founded in Ottawa in 1942 primarily to respond to the educational needs of the thousands of young people who had come to the national capital in support of the war effort.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the Ontario university system entered another period of rapid, sustained growth. New universities were established to cope with rising demand — Brock, Laurentian, Ryerson University, and Trent being examples.

In 1967, the province opened 19 colleges of applied arts and technology. The new institutions were built on the existing technology institutes and vocational centres. Soon there were 22 colleges, as several campuses of existing institutions became separate colleges. French-language colleges brought the total number to 24.

Over the years, Ontario's public postsecondary system has been complemented by a diverse private career-college sector, which has continually grown over the past several decades to provide market-driven postsecondary programming. The non-degree programs offered by these private career colleges are vocational in nature and are primarily intended for people who seek to obtain specific skills for a specific occupation.

To expand public educational opportunities and study options for residents throughout Ontario, various initiatives have been undertaken to support a province-wide open-learning system. These include distance education through Contact North and the Franco-Ontarian Distance Education Network, credit transfer arrangements, prior learning assessment in colleges, and increased cooperation and collaboration among institutions. Under the SuperBuild initiative, $2.2 billion was invested in major capital projects across Ontario. This investment will create additional student spaces to accommodate expected student demand for postsecondary education in Ontario.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and credentials offered by degree-granting institutions

Ontario universities offer a full range of undergraduate and graduate programs in a wide variety of educational settings. The University of Toronto, with a total enrolment of more than 50,000 students, 129 academic departments, and 75 doctoral programs, is the largest English-language university in Canada and a major centre for research and graduate studies. The University of Ottawa is North America's oldest and largest bilingual university, offering a wide range of programs in both English and French.

Students can choose to study at large urban universities or smaller undergraduate institutions such as Trent or Brock. The intimacy and personal attention that are typically found at smaller universities are also available at most of the province's larger institutions through their federated and affiliated colleges and universities.

The University of Waterloo is a world leader in the field of cooperative education, combining academic studies with on-the-job training. Ryerson University specializes in particular fields, such as applied professional programs.

General undergraduate degrees at most universities in Ontario require three years of full-time study. Honours degrees, involving a higher level of concentration in the honours discipline and a higher level of academic performance, generally require four years of full-time study. Most universities also offer diploma and certificate programs in various specialized fields. These can vary in length from two to three years, depending on the program and the institution. The Ontario Government has been working to ensure that postsecondary programs are more responsive to the needs of local communities. This includes establishing a new standard for a four-year baccalaureate degree in nursing, to improve quality of health care available in Ontario. University calendars are the best sources of information about specific program requirements.

Most universities offer part-time and distance-education programs, often through community cable television and other telecommunications media. In 1986, the government established Contact North/Contact Nord, a distance-education network that delivers university, college, and secondary-school courses to some 100 communities across northern Ontario. Network sites are equipped with computers, audio and video conferencing equipment, and other telecommunications technologies. In 2007, elearnnetwork.ca was established to provide residents in eastern and southern Ontario with increased and direct access to learning and training opportunities. The Node Web site contains a database of all distance-education opportunities at Ontario universities, and is a valuable resource for those interested in university-level distance learning. Courses listed are offered through traditional distance-education delivery methods such as print correspondence, and also through technology-mediated learning methods, such as the Internet.

In addition to the publicly supported universities, 17 privately funded institutions in Ontario — all with religious affiliations — have restricted degree-granting authority through an act of the Ontario legislature. A number of other private and out-of-province public institutions have been granted authority by the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities to offer specified degree programs in Ontario. Information about the degree-granting status of any institution in Ontario is available through the Postsecondary Accountability Branch of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. Please visit http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/postsec/degreegauth.html for more information.

In Ontario, public colleges of applied arts and technology have also received authority from the ministry to offer baccalaureate programs in applied areas of study. A complete list of these programs can be found at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/postsec/CAATconsents.html.

Programs and credentials offered by non-degree-granting institutions

Together, Ontario's 24 public colleges of applied arts and technology, with more than 100 campuses across the province, offer some 700 programs in business, social services, health sciences, applied technology, applied arts, communications, and a host of other fields. Most college programs are career-oriented and are intended to prepare students for employment in their desired fields. Many programs have been created to meet the needs expressed by employers for people trained in specific employment skills, and have been developed with the active involvement of local experts.

Most college programs fall into two categories: diploma programs that vary from two to three years in duration and certificate programs that generally require one year of full-time study or less. College programs include not only traditional postsecondary programs but also post-basic programs, college preparatory programs, and adult-training programs funded by the provincial government.

In addition to this broad range of programs, colleges offer extensive and varied career development, personal development, and special-interest courses during the day and in the evening. Custom-tailored courses and programs, designed to meet the training needs of particular businesses and industries, are available in many fields on a contract basis. Colleges also provide the classroom training portion of apprenticeship training.

Recent initiatives in distance education and alternative delivery strategies are also widening the choices available to students in accessing postsecondary educational services. Colleges are actively involved with Contact North and elearnnetwork.ca in the delivery of college programming to over 110 northern communities. The French-language colleges rely heavily on distance-education modes of delivery in their operations and, in cooperation with bilingual universities, have formed the Franco-Ontarian Distance Education Network. Other innovations in delivery modes include videoconferencing and computer-mediated instruction.

A system of prior learning assessment (PLA) has been implemented in all Ontario colleges. PLA allows for the evaluation of past learning against established academic standards so that college credits can be awarded.

The province's three agricultural colleges and one school of horticulture offer two- and three-year diploma and certificate programs leading to careers in areas such as field-crop and livestock production, agribusiness management, food and nutrition management, and horticulture.

Hospital-based programs include diploma programs in areas such as medical-laboratory technology and radiotherapy. Most of these programs require 24 to 32 months of study. The Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences offers three-year diploma programs in areas such as nuclear-medicine technology and respiratory therapy.

For over 100 years, private career colleges (PCCs) have had an important role in preparing Ontario students for entry into occupations. About 570 PCCs across Ontario offer approximately 3,000 registered programs to approximately 36,000 students in 70 communities. PCCs must be registered and have their programs approved by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities under the Private Career Colleges Act, 2005. This act ensures that private career colleges meet certain standards for the programs they offer and for their advertising, refund policies, and instructor qualifications.

PCCs are independent organizations that offer certificate and diploma programs in fields such as business, health services, human services, applied arts, information technology, electronics, services, and trades. Some PCCs operate as for-profit businesses; others operate as not-for-profit institutions. Registered PCCs range in size from small ones offering one program to large multi-campus organizations with on-site student-support services.

Registered PCCs and approved programs can be found using the on-line search tool http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/searchpcc.html. It is important to note that students enrolled in an unregistered college or an unapproved program are not covered by the protections provided by the government under the Private Career Colleges Act, 2005.

ToC / TdM Admission requirements

Under the existing requirements of the Ontario Secondary School Curriculum for students in grades 11 and 12, students wishing to enter college or university must have an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD), which consists of 30 credits (18 compulsory and 12 optional). Universities require 6 of these credits to be grade-12 university-preparation or university/college-preparation courses. Colleges require an OSSD with a mixture of grade-12 university/college- and college-preparation courses. In addition, all secondary students must complete 40 hours of community service to complete the OSSD requirements.

All grade-11 and -12 courses within the Ontario curriculum are coded to indicate the subject, grade level, and destination. The destination for university-preparation courses is designated with a U, for college with a C, and university/college with an M. For example, the Grade-12 English university-preparation course is coded ENG4U while the Grade-12 college-preparation course is coded ENG4C, and the Grade-12 Challenge and Change in Society university/college-preparation course is coded HSB4M.

The Ontario curriculum also has two other designations for courses in grades 11 and 12: workplace preparation courses, coded E, are designed to prepare students for direct entry into the workplace; and open courses, coded O, which are not linked to any specific postsecondary destination and are appropriate for all students.

Students seeking admission to undergraduate programs in Ontario universities and to the Ontario College of Art and Design must direct their applications to the Ontario Universities' Application Centre (OUAC). Canadian residents pay an application fee of $105 for the service and $35 for any additional program choice or university; for international students, the fee is $120 in Canadian currency, payable by international money order. Students applying for admission to graduate programs in universities direct their applications to the university of their choice.

A student applying to a college of applied arts and technology must have an OSSD or equivalent, or be 19 years of age. A College of Applied Arts and Technology Admissions Policy Review Committee was established to revise the college-admissions policy to align it with the changes in secondary-school curriculum. The admissions policy, released by the ministry on June 30, 2000, does not direct colleges to use C or U/C courses for admission requirements; however, a principle of the policy states that C and U/C preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for colleges. In keeping with the access mandate for the colleges, the admissions policy prohibits the use of U or OAC courses as an admission requirement, unless that admission requirement is part of a college/university collaborative=program agreement.

Students seeking admission to the colleges of applied arts and technology and to the agricultural colleges in Alfred, Kemptville, and Ridgetown direct their applications to the Ontario College Application Service. There is a $95 fee for the service.

As a further assistance to Ontario students, the government requires all public institutions to make available Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). These indicators include graduation, employment, and loan-default rates for recent graduates of the institutions, and are meant to aid students in their decisions about which institution and program of study they choose. Registered private careers colleges approved for Ontario student loans are also required to submit loan-default rates.

A student applying for admission to a private career college must meet the following requirements:

· have an Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent; or

· be 18 years or older and pass a qualifying test that has been approved by the Superintendent; or

· meet other academic qualifications or minimum age requirements established as a condition of the ministry's approval program; and

· have met all additional admission requirements established by the PCC for the program.

PCCs can admit students who do not meet the admission requirements of a program on a provisional basis (e.g., sign a contract for the delivery of a program). However, students are entitled to a full refund of fees paid for a program, minus 20% of the total fees paid for a program, or $500, whichever is less, if they do not meet the program's admission requirements when the program begins.

There is no central organization that facilitates applications for PCCs. Students who are interested in a program offered by a registered PCC need to apply to the PCC directly. Enrolment in a registered PCC must be done by the student and the PCC, signing a written enrolment contract that meets the requirements of the Private Career Colleges Act. The college is responsible for providing those educational services that are outlined in the contract. This contract must be signed by both the student and the college's owner or representative. Both parties should retain a copy. Students have a two-day "cooling off" period after signing the contract to decide if they really want to take the program. Students who change their minds and inform the college in writing before the end of the two days are entitled to a full refund of all fees paid, including the application fee.

ToC / TdM Tuition and financial assistance

In 2005, the Liberal government announced its new "Reaching Higher" initiative, which would provide a cummulative investment of $6.2 billion for colleges, universities, and training by 2009–10, the largest multi-year investment in postsecondary education in 40 years.

In the 2007–08 academic year, undergraduate tuition fees for arts and science programs at Ontario universities averaged $4,547, and the average for colleges was $2,008.

Ontario deregulated international-student tuition fees for both universities and colleges beginning in 1996–97, allowing individual institutions to set their own fees.

Registered PCCs in Ontario are responsible for establishing tuition fees for their program offerings. Although institutions are required to report their tuition fees for approved programs and may not charge more than the reported amount, the ministry does not play a role in regulating PCCs' tuition fees.

The Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) provides financial assistance to eligible provincial residents studying at colleges, universities, and eligible PCCs. OSAP includes Canada Student Loans, Ontario Student Loans, work-study plans, and various bursary programs, including bursaries for students with disabilities.

Ontario colleges and universities also offer financial assistance in the form of scholarships and bursaries to their students. The Queen Elizabeth II Aiming for the Top scholarships — available since fall of 2000 — recognize high-school graduates receiving top marks. More than 4,000 of these scholarships were awarded in the fall of 2003. In 2005–06, $192 million was invested in student financial assistance, and up to $1.5 billion was invested over the next five years.

Related Resources

The following link provides more information on postsecondary education in Ontario: http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/

Additional links to Ontario resources are provided at: http://www.cicic.ca/475/ontario.canada

2009 01 25

Postsecondary Education in Nunavut

ToC / TdM Territorial Overview

Postsecondary education in Nunavut is delivered primarily through Nunavut Arctic College.

The college has three campuses: the Nunatta Campus in Iqaluit, the Kitikmeot Campus in Cambridge Bay, and the Kivalliq Campus in Rankin Inlet, as well as a network of 24 community learning centres.

In addition to providing university-level transfer, certificate, and diploma programs, the colleges provide adult education and literacy programs, skills development programs, trades training, educational assessment, and counselling.

The territorial Department of Education, with headquarters in Iqaluit and Arviat, has responsibility for postsecondary education. The college is overseen by the Minister responsible for Nunavut Arctic College.

ToC / TdM  History

Before the creation of Nunavut in 1999, the eastern area of the Canadian Arctic was part of the Northwest Territories. There, the responsibility for education was transferred from the federal government to the NWT's new Department of Education in 1969. In the mid-1980s, a decentralized system of regional campuses was established as Arctic College. In 1995, Arctic College was divided into two colleges - Aurora College serving the western part of the territories and Nunavut Arctic College serving the east. With the creation of Nunavut in 1999, Nunavut Arctic College became the means of delivering postsecondary education in the new territory.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Nunavut Arctic College offers a variety of certificate, diploma, trades, and university transfer programs in areas such as teacher education, health careers, career development, and community administration.

Programs vary in length from eight weeks (trades programs) to two years, but, generally speaking, certificate and university transfer programs involve one year of full-time studies and diploma programs, two years. In addition, the college provides adult basic education, skills development courses, trades training, and contract training on behalf of local employers. The college has an established process to allow students to apply for course credits for previous learning and work experience.

Nunavut Arctic College has transfer and cooperative arrangements with a number of institutions in the south, including the University of Regina, Dalhousie University, Saint Francis Xavier University, University of Prince Edward Island, University of Alberta, University of Lethbridge, Athabasca University, Royal Roads University, University of Manitoba, and the Council for Advancement of Native Development Officers.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

All students must be 17 years of age or older. High school graduation is normally required for most university-level programs at the college, but, since admission requirements vary from program to program, it is best to consult the college calendar for details. Special consideration is given to mature applicants who are 17 or older and who have been out of school for a least a year. The college has an open admissions policy for students pursuing adult basic education and skills development courses.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

In 2009-10, full-time tuition fees for certificate and diploma programs at the college were $3,700 per year. Tuition fees for individual courses reflect the actual costs of the course. There are no differential fees for foreign students, although this policy is under review.

The Government of Nunavut administers a student financial assistance program for territorial residents. Students may be able to access grants for travel, living allowances, and tuition and books provided they meet certain eligibility criteria while loans may also be available.

Revision: 2010-05-03


Postsecondary Education in Prince Edward Island

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Postsecondary education in Prince Edward Island is delivered through the province's one publicly funded university, the University of Prince Edward Island; Holland College, a publicly funded community college with eleven training centres throughout the province; the francophone Adult Learning Centre in Wellington, established by the Education Society of Prince Edward Island, and a number of private vocational training schools (sometimes called career colleges).

The University of Prince Edward Island is home to the Atlantic Veterinary College, which serves all four Atlantic provinces - Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland. Holland College welcomes students of all ages and educational backgrounds to its full-time, adult and community education and continuing education programs. The francophone Adult Learning Centre (the Collège Acadie Î.-P.-É,) employs state-of-the-art distance education technology to link Prince Edward Islanders to francophone learning opportunities in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Approximately 20 private training schools offer a wide assortment of vocational programs ranging from computer technology to personal health care.

The provincial Department of Innovation and Advanced Learning is responsible for the province's postsecondary system.

ToC / TdM History

St. Andrew's College, founded in 1831 to train Roman Catholic clergy, was the province's first institution of higher learning. The college remained operational until 1845. It was replaced by St. Dunstan's College, which opened its doors in 1855, and achieved university status 30 years later. The Central Academy, later Prince of Wales College, was founded by the government in 1834. The college did not achieve degree-granting powers until 1965.

Following the recommendations of a royal commission into the province's postsecondary education system, Prince of Wales College and St. Dunstan's University were merged into the University of Prince Edward Island in 1969.

Other recommendations from the royal commission led to the creation of Holland College, in 1969, on the campus of the former Prince of Wales College.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and credentials offered by the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI)

Building upon the academic traditions of its predecessor institutions, Prince of Wales College and St. Dunstan's University, UPEI explores innovative methods of teaching and features a strong network of faculty, staff, and student researchers in every discipline.

UPEI's 200-member faculty provides a rich blend of academic programs in arts, sciences, business, education, nursing, and veterinary medicine to over 3,599 full- and part-time students. Graduate programs - Master of Veterinary Medicine, PhD (veterinary medicine), Master of Science (chemistry and biology), Master of Education, and Master of Arts in Island Studies - internship opportunities, and exchange programs are offered in addition to a wide selection of courses coordinated by Continuing and Distance Education and other departments.

The university also offers a certificate and a diploma program in public administration; certificate programs in human resource management and management development for women; diploma programs in school librarianship, adult education, and inclusive education; and a three-year diploma program in engineering.

Undergraduate programs require four years of full-time study. Honours programs, available in history, English, psychology, biology, and physics also require four years of full-time study, with a higher level of concentration in the honours subject, as well as a higher level of academic achievement.

For the graduate programs offered in conjunction with the Atlantic Veterinary College, a master of science degree requires two years of study beyond the undergraduate level. The doctor of veterinary medicine degree requires four years of study beyond a specified undergraduate program and work experience. Since January 1996, a PhD program is also being offered in conjunction with the veterinary college. Normally, the prerequisite is a master's degree in science, and the program requires three to five years of full-time study.

Programs and credentials offered by Holland College

Holland College offers over 65 full-time, career-oriented programs in a wide variety of fields including accounting, aircraft maintenance technology, automotive technology, business administration, carpentry, cooking, corrections, early childhood education, medical support services, paramedicine, nursing assistance, hotel and restaurant management, journalism, marine engineering, administrative assistance, retail sales and marketing, and graphic design. Applications to Holland College are accepted throughout the year. However, there are specific student selection dates for programs beginning in September, January, February, March, and April. Priority in acceptance is given to applications received by those selection dates.

The cornerstone of Holland College programs is CBE (competency-based education). CBE is an educational system that emphasizes the specification, learning, and demonstration of those competencies - skills and knowledge - that are central to a given career, activity, or task.

Among the features that distinguish CBE are the identification of skills by industry and students' evaluations based on performance of these skills. As part of the CBE approach to education, every college program includes an on-the-job training (OJT), internship/cooperative education component, which ensures that each college student has an opportunity to apply his or her newly acquired skills and knowledge to the -real world.- Students should note that an OJT placement is a required component of their training and is not compensable by the college or the placement site.

The college has created partnerships and centres of excellence to enable it to focus on the resources of key industries and to customize training to industry needs. Located in several communities across the Island, they include the Atlantic Tourism and Hospitality Institute, the Culinary Institute of Canada, the Justice Institute of Canada, the PEI Institute of Adult and Community Education, the Aerospace and Industrial Technology Centre, and the Atlantic Welding and Fabrication Centre.

Programs and credentials offered by Collège Acadie Î.-P.-É,, Wellington, PEI

Since 1995, the Collège Acadie Î.-P.-É, has been serving the PEI francophone population via the satellite office in Wellington, PEI. Collège Acadie Î.-P.-É, avails itself of distance education programming, general education programs, and literacy programs, as well as retraining courses and French-as-a-second-language courses. A master's in education program is currently being offered to Island teachers of French by the Université de Moncton, New Brunswick.

Programs and credentials offered by registered private training schools

Especially over the past decade, there have been a growing number of privately operated institutions, which provide characteristically -hands-on- training, a mix of theory and practical learning, leading to a great variety of occupations. The programs range in length from twelve weeks to more than a year and result in a diploma or certificate of achievement issued by the schools. Training is available in fields such as hairdressing, aesthetics, truck driving, school bus driving, flying, computer technologies, network administration, computer applications support, Web site development, office skills and administrative support, accounting, business practices, travel and tourism, pharmacy (technician), call centre service, counselling, residential care, home health care (aide), teaching English as a second language, heavy equipment operation, teaching assistance, professional make-up artistry, graphic art, animation, and fitness and lifestyle training.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

There are three years of senior high school in Prince Edward Island, grades 10 through 12, leading to a high school graduation certificate. Successful completion of the university preparatory program is required for admission to the University of Prince Edward Island's undergraduate programs. The university also makes provisions for mature students who lack high school certification. Admission to the doctor of veterinary medicine (DVM) program requires 20 pre-requisite courses. A limited number of seats in the DVM program are available to international students.

Requirements for specific programs at Holland College may vary considerably. The minimum academic requirement is a high school diploma or the equivalent. Many programs have additional requirements that are unique to that area of study. For specific program prerequisites, please refer to each program's listing. Mature applicants who do not meet the minimum requirement may also be considered if their life experiences are likely to contribute to their success at the college.

Admission policies may vary considerably among the private vocational training schools but in general resemble those for the public community college: high school diploma or equivalent, with an allowance for mature student status. Specialized programs may have additional screening criteria.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

Undergraduate tuition fees for the 2008-09 academic year were $4,530 for a 10-course load for full-time students at UPEI ($453 per three semester hours of credit). The foreign differential fee for full-time students (academic year) was $4,410 and for part-time students (per course), $441.

Graduate program fees for the 2008-09 academic year

  • Master of Education: $621 per three semester hours of credit (Canadian); Thesis: $2,484
  • Master of Science program: $5,934 (Canadian); $14,754 (international)
  • Master of Science/course (credit): $621 (Canadian)
  • Master of Science/course (audit): $415
  • International differential fee, part-time student (per course): $340

Postgraduate program fees for the 2008-09 academic year

  • PhD Program: $8,901 (Canadian students); $22,131 (international students)
  • Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
    Canadian students
    Years 1, 2, 3 and 4: $8,988
    International students
    Year 1: $48,380
    Year 2: $47,608
    Year 3: $46,848
    Year 4: $46,108

Tuition fees at Holland College vary, depending upon the program and duration. Tuition fees for full-time programs range from $3,250 to $18,000. Fees for international students start at $6,250.

There is a great range in tuition fees and other charges among the private vocational training schools and their individual programs. The least expensive programs tend to be at the $4,000 level; the longest program can cost $20,000 or more.

The provincial government maintains a student assistance program for provincial residents, which complements the Canada Student Loans Program. In addition, various scholarship programs are available through the university and the college, as well as from private agencies.

Revision: 2010-12-03


Postsecondary Education in Quebec

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Since 1967, Quebec's postsecondary system has been divided into two types of institutions: cégeps (collèges d'enseignement général et professionnel) and universities. Cegeps and similar colleges provide an intermediate level of study between secondary school and university and offering a range of technical programs leading to employment.

The university network includes 18 institutions, and the college network comprises 48 public cégeps, 24 subsidized private colleges, 26 licensed, non-subsidized private colleges, two of which are governed by an international agreement, and four public institutions governed by an agency other than the Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport.

The Université du Québec, the largest university in Canada, is made up of six constituent universities, two specialized schools and one research centre. It is the only university in the country that truly constitutes a province-wide system, similar to some state universities in the United States.

The Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport is responsible for the province's postsecondary system, while the Ministère du Développement économique, de l'Innovation et de l'Exportation has responsibilities in the areas of university research and college transfer.

ToC / TdM History

Quebec is home to Canada's oldest French-language institution of higher education -- Université Laval -- founded in 1663 as the Grand Séminaire de Québec and awarded a royal charter in 1852. The province's first English-language university, McGill, was chartered in 1821. Classes began at McGill in 1829, the same year that a Montreal medical school was merged with the university. Bishop's University, a small English-language institution specializing in undergraduate education, was granted university status in 1856. The Université de Montréal, which began as a branch of Université Laval, was granted its own charter in 1920. Today, two degree-granting schools -- École Polytechnique and École des Hautes Études Commerciales (HEC Montreal) -- are affiliated with the university, specializing in engineering and management respectively.

Beginning in the 1950s and especially in the 1960s, demand for university education in Quebec grew substantially as a result of population growth, the democratization of education, and new postsecondary training needs. The Université de Sherbrooke was established in 1954. Concordia University was established in 1974 with the merger of two earlier institutions, Loyola College and Sir George Williams University.

In 1968, the Quebec National Assembly passed an act establishing the Université du Québec, the province's fourth French-language postsecondary institution. Today, with headquarters in Quebec City, the Université du Québec has a network of institutions throughout the province. These include one associated university with its own degree-granting authority (the Université du Québec à Montréal), five other constituent universities (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Université du Québec à Hull, and Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue), one research institute (Institut national de la recherche scientifique), and two specialized degree-granting schools (École nationale d'administration publique and École de technologie supérieure). Télé-université is now integrated in UQAM and continues to specialize in distance education.

Throughout much of its history, postsecondary education in Quebec was largely provided by church-governed classical colleges whose eight-year curriculum prepared elite students for university entrance. Many of these institutions were established during the French colonial era. There were about 30 classical colleges across the province at the time of Confederation in 1867.

In the early 1960s, trends in Quebec society, including high population growth, industrialization, and urbanization, made it imperative for the province to create a network of institutions to absorb the new student clientele and provide technical training. A provincial royal commission on education recommended that the government provide greater coordination for the college system. Cégeps were set up as government-financed, public corporations to deliver general and vocational education at the college level. Today, cégeps perform a dual function - providing an intermediate level between secondary school and university (pre-university programs) and offering a wide range of technical and professional programs to students seeking entry to the work force. Public cégeps are tuition-free to Quebec residents.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and credentials offered by degree-granting institutions

Quebec university-level teaching and research institutions offer a full range of degree programs at the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels, as well as a variety of certificate and diploma programs, which usually require one year of study. Some universities, such as Université Laval, Université de Montréal, McGill University, Concordia University, Université de Sherbrooke, and Université du Québec à Montréal, offer a wide range of both undergraduate and graduate programs. Bishop's University and some institutions within the Université du Québec system (Trois-Rivières, Chicoutimi, Rimouski, Hull, and Abitibi-Témiscamingue) tend to focus on a range of undergraduate programs, but also offer an increasing number of programs at the master's and doctoral levels.

Educational settings vary from large, research-intensive, urban universities to small specialized or regional teaching institutions. Some of the institutions within the Université du Québec system, as well as the two schools affiliated with the Université de Montréal, are highly specialized, offering programs in areas such as health care, high technology, public administration, engineering, and management.

A number of university-level institutions, including Université de Sherbrooke, Institut de technologie supérieure, École polytechnique, and Concordia University, offer cooperative education programs that combine academic study with on-the-job training.

A number of university-level institutions, including Université de Sherbrooke, Institut de technologie supérieure, and Concordia University, offer paid cooperative education programs that combine academic study with on-the-job training.

Undergraduate programs include honours bachelor's degrees, bachelor's degrees with a major and a minor, general bachelor's degrees, undergraduate certificates, attestations, and diplomas. Generally speaking, a Diplôme d'études collégiales, or the equivalent, is required for admission to an undergraduate program. Bachelor's degree programs generally require three years of full-time study, or 90 to 120 credits, after completion of a two-year cégep program. Undergraduate honours degrees require a higher level of concentration in the honours subject and higher academic standing but do not usually require an additional year of study.

Programs leading to diplomas, certificates, and attestations are particularly popular within French-language institutions. These programs normally require 30 credits.

Master's degree and graduate diploma programs generally require a bachelor's degree for admission. Master's programs usually involve 45 to 60 credits for graduation. In addition, universities offer shorter (30 credit) graduate diploma programs with a professional focus leading to the diplôme d'études supérieures spécialisées (deuxième cycle).

Doctoral programs generally require a master's degree for admission, although, in exceptional cases, candidates may be admitted with an honours bachelor's degree. Doctoral programs normally require 90 to 120 credits, including a thesis, for completion.

Programs and credentials offered by non-degree-granting institutions

College-level institutions offer students a choice between pre-university and technical programs. In either case, students take a core curriculum, part of which is common to both streams. Both pre-university and technical studies lead to the diplôme d'études collégiales (DEC).

Pre-university two-year cégep programs lead to university admission. There are eight pre-university fields: natural sciences, humanities, arts and letters, music, visual arts, dance, history and civilization, and science, letters and arts. A ninth program is offered on a test basis until 2012-13: Computer Science and Mathematics.  Some institutions also offer the International Baccalaureate (IB).

Cégep three-year technical programs train students for technician or technologist positions. Technical programs can also be followed by university admission in some cases. There are more than 100 technical programs in areas such as biological sciences technology, physical science technology, humanities technology, administrative technology, and arts.

In addition to programs leading to the diplôme d'études collégiales, cégeps also offer shorter programs leading to an attestation d'études collégiales (AEC).

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Elementary and secondary education in Quebec covers 11 years - six at the elementary level, five at the secondary level. The Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport sets examinations for some courses during the last two years of secondary school, secondary IV and secondary V, and maintains a central registry for issuing marks, official transcripts, and diplomas.

All Quebec secondary school graduates who are continuing with their education enrol in a college-level institution, opting for a pre-university program or a career-oriented diploma program similar to those offered by community colleges in other provinces.

Most universities require a general college-level diploma that includes a combination of courses appropriate to the program to which the student is applying. Some institutions will admit Canadian students from outside Quebec on the basis of an appropriate grade 12 program. Others require a preparatory year of university after secondary school. Mature applicants over the age of 21, 22, or 23, depending on the institution, may be given special consideration.

Institutions offer integration services for foreign students. The Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport publishes information materials accessible on its Web site.

Foreign students who have been admitted to a university and who receive an official notice of admission are required to obtain a Quebec Certificate of Acceptance prior to their arrival in Quebec. The certificate is issued by the Ministère de l'Immigration et des Communautés culturelles. Candidates apply for the certificate through the Quebec Immigration Service or the Canadian diplomatic mission serving their country. Foreign students are required to provide proof of sufficient funds for study in Quebec and to take out personal medical insurance from a Canadian insurance company for the duration of their stay.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

In 2010-11, full-time undergraduate tuition fees averaged $2,068.00, or about $68.93 per credit for Quebec residents. Since the fall of 1997, Canadian students from outside Quebec who enrol in university-level programs at the bachelor's and master's level have been charged additional fees. For 2010-11, these charges amount to an additional $188.92 per credit, or about $5,668.00 per year.

University tuition fees for foreign undergraduate students are made up of two components - the regular tuition fees of approximately $69 per credit paid by Quebec students and additional flat fees divided according to the following three categories:

  1. In the deregulated disciplines (engineering, computer sciences, mathematics, pure science, administration, law), the flat fee, kept by the university, is unilimited and must be higher than the flat fee required in the Class B regulated disciplines ($12,810).
  2. In the Class A regulated disciplines (humanities and social sciences, geography, education, physical education, literature), the yearly flat fee is $11,267.00.
  3. In the Class B disciplines (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, paramedical sciences, pharmacy, nursing, agriculture, forestry and geodesy, architecture and environmental design, fine arts, cinema, photographie, music), the yearly flat fee is 12,810.00.

Graduate foreign students (2nd cycle) are required to pay an annual flat fee of $11,267.00 in addition to the regular tuition fees ($2,068 per year) paid by Quebec residents.

Graduate foreign students (3rd cycle) are required to pay an annual flat fee of $9,916.00 in addition to the regular tuition fees ($2,068 per year) paid by Quebec residents.

Foreign students registered in 2nd cycle medical internship programs must pay an annual flat fee of $19,530.00 in addition to the regular tuition fees paid by Quebec residents.

Quebec residents attend public cégeps tuition free. Beginning with the 2000-01 academic year, Canadian citizens and permanent residents from outside Quebec have been charged tuition for each session. For 2010-11 and 2011-12, the amount is set at $1124 and 1198 per session respectively. Foreign student fees at the province's cégeps are about $4644 per session in 2010-11 ($4949 in 2011-12) for the pre-university stream in humanities technology and administrative technology, $6012 per session ($6406 in 2011-12) for physical science technology and arts and literature technology, and $7198 per session ($7670 in 2008-09) for biological science technology.

In addition to tuition, students are required to pay student service fees, fees for educational materials, and student association dues. Foreign students are also responsible for health insurance. Some universities offer group health insurance negotiated by the student associations.

Each year, a limited number of foreign students from countries with which Quebec has agreements are exempted from the supplemental fees normally charged to international students.

The Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport administers the Quebec Student Loans Program, which provides assistance to Quebec residents who lack the financial resources to study at the postsecondary level.

The Canadian International Development Agency administers the Programme canadien de bourses de la Francophonie for students from French-speaking countries who are eligible for Canadian development assistance. Interested students should inquire about the program from the educational authority in their home country or their local Canadian diplomatic mission.

Revision: 2010-11-10


Postsecondary Education in Saskatchewan

ToC / TdM Provincial Overview

Postsecondary education in Saskatchewan is delivered through two publicly funded universities and their federated and affiliated colleges; the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST), with institutes in four locations; seven regional colleges that broker programs offered by the universities and SIAST to communities throughout the province; the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT); the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC); and 41 private vocational schools.

The University of Saskatchewan has one federated college -- St. Thomas More College -- and seven affiliates -- St. Andrew's College, the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Central Pentecostal College, St. Peter's College, the College of Emmanuel and St. Chad, Briercrest College and Seminary, and the Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research.

The University of Regina has three federated colleges -- Campion College, Luther College, and First Nations University of Canada (formerly known as the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College) and two affiliates -- the Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research, and SIAST.

Saskatchewan Advanced Education is the provincial ministry responsible for Saskatchewan's postsecondary education system, including adult learning.

ToC / TdM History

The University of Saskatchewan, located in the city of Saskatoon, was established by an act of the provincial legislature in 1907, just two years after the province joined Confederation. In 1912, the university assumed responsibility for educational programs that previously were provided through the provincial Department of Agriculture.The University of Regina, located in the city of Regina, was established as Regina College in 1911. The college became a constituent part of the University of Saskatchewan in 1934. It obtained degree-granting status as a separate institution in 1974.

Several other postsecondary institutions trace their histories to the early decades of this century. Luther College was founded in 1913, Campion College in 1917, and St. Thomas More in 1936. The Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, the only fully accredited First Nations-controlled university college in North America, was founded in 1976. In June 2003, the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College relocated to a new building and officially changed its name to the First Nations University of Canada.

The Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) was founded in 1976 to offer educational programs to First Nations adults through an academic partnership with SIAST. On July 1, 2000, the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies Act was established to allow SIIT to design, establish, and provide courses and programs of study, instruction, and training in academic, applied, scientific, trade, technical, and vocational fields.

The Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research (GDI), the only wholly Métis owned and controlled educational institution of its kind in Canada, was established in 1980 to provide educational and cultural programming to the province's Métis and Non-status Indian populations. As the educational arm of the Métis Nation - Saskatchewan, the institute works cooperatively with a number of educational partners and is affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Regina. The institute also has a federation agreement with SIAST to have its subsidiary, the Dumont Technical Institute (DTI), deliver adult basic education and skills training.

The Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) was established by the provincial legislature in 1987 with an act that amalgamated four technical institutes, an advanced technology centre, and four urban community colleges. Today, SIAST's four campuses -- Kelsey Campus in Saskatoon, Palliser Campus in Moose Jaw, Wascana Campus in Regina, and Woodland Campus in Prince Albert -- offer a wide range of programs, including adult basic education, certificate and diploma programs, apprenticeship training programs, cooperative education, and customized training. In July 2012, SIAST became authorized under The Degree Authorization Act to deliver a Bachelor of Psychiatric Nursing degree.

The province's seven regional colleges were formed in 1988, based on colleges originally formed in the 1970s and given the mandate to brokeruniversity and SIAST programs to communities throughout the province. Regional colleges also offer a wide array of programming and services such as adult basic education and literacy training, customized training for industry, and career counselling. Lakeland College (established under Alberta legislation) also provides education and training programs and services to Saskatchewan residents in the Lloydminster area.

The Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC) was established in 1999 to create a relevant, accessible, and responsive apprenticeship training and certification system to meet employers' and employees' needs and priorities. SATCC is responsible for managing and administering all apprenticeship training for apprentices in Saskatchewan. Apprenticeship technical training is delivered by SIAST, SIIT, regional colleges, private vocational schools, SaskPower, the Saskatchewan Tourism Education Council, and out-of-province colleges.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Programs and Credentials Offered by Degree-Granting Institutions

The University of Saskatchewan offers a broad range of undergraduate, master's, doctorate, and post-doctorate and research programs. These include programs in the arts and sciences, agriculture, kinesiology, physical therapy, biotechnology, medicine, law, engineering, pharmacy, education, dentistry, commerce, and nursing. The university is also home to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, which serves all four Western Canadian provinces.

The University of Regina offers undergraduate degrees in arts, business administration, education, engineering, fine arts, journalism, computer science, the natural sciences, kinesiology and health sciences, and social work. The university also offers a number of graduate programs at the master's and doctoral levels, as well as one- and two-year certificate programs in fields such as vocational education, visual arts, computer science, human justice, and social work.

For both universities, general arts and science degrees usually require four years of full-time study. Honours degrees, which require a higher concentration in the honours subject and a higher level of academic performance, are offered as well. This is also true of undergraduate degrees in specialized fields such as journalism, education, engineering, agriculture, commerce, nursing, and social work.

Students registered with the universities' federated colleges earn degrees from the parent university. Most of the affiliated colleges grant degrees in theology and divinity.First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv) is academically federated with the University of Regina. Its mission is to enhance the quality of life and to preserve, protect and interpret the history, language culture and artistic heritage of First Nations. Through its Board of Governors, FNUniv is under the jurisdiction of the Indian Government of Saskatchewan, the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN). The FNUniv is a full member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC).

FNUniv offers all programs available at the University of Regina in the Faculties of Arts and Sciences as well as its own programs through two academic departments,the Department of Interdisciplinary Programs, and the Department of Professional Programs. FNUniv serves both First Nations and non-First Nations students in an atmosphere of First Nations cultural affirmation at their three campus locations in Saskatchewan -- Regina, Saskatoon, and Prince Albert.

Pursuant to The Degree Authorization Act, SIAST and Briercrest College and Seminary have been authorized to grant, respectively, a Bachelor of Psychiatric Nursing program and a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities.

Programs and Credentials Offered by Non-Degree-Granting Institutions

SIAST offers a broad range of career-oriented certificate and diploma programs in applied/visual media, aviation, business, community/human services, engineering technology, health services, hospitality/foodservices, industrial/trades, natural resources, nursing, recreation/tourism, science and technology. In addition, the institute offers adult basic education, vocational training, customized training for industry, and various cooperative education programs.

SIAST diploma programs require two years of full-time study, while certificate programs are usually completed in one year. Some of SIAST's programs include a mandatory cooperative education component, where students spend 16 to 19 months in academic study and an additional 11 to 12 months engaged in paid work experience.

The Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) offers certificate and diploma programs in administration, business administration, Indian business management, local health administration, integrated resource management, integrated land management, automotive service technology, community health, and chemical dependency worker training. Certificate programs usually require 24 weeks to one year of full-time study. Diploma programs generally require two or three years of full-time study. The institute also offers various adult basic education and literacy programs.

In cooperation with the University of Saskatchewan, the University of Regina, and SIAST, the Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research and its subsidiaries offer certificate and diploma programs in Native human justice, Métis management, Métis social work, Métis entrepreneurship, chemical dependency worker training, adult basic education, vocational and preparatory programs, and the Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP). Certificate programs can require one or two years of full-time study; diploma programs usually require two years of study. SUNTEP and the Northern Teacher Education Program (NORTEP) offer a four-year bachelor of education program for aboriginal teachers in cooperation with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Advanced Education. and the two universities. Dumont Technical Institute (DTI) maintains a federation agreement with SIAST, which allows it to broker provincially and nationally accredited programming. DTI also delivers basic education courses and partners with SIIT and regional colleges in the delivery of other technical and community-based programs.The Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC) manages apprenticeship training and trade certification for the 47 designated trades in Saskatchewan. Apprenticeship training varies by trade but is typically delivered over four years, including up to eight weeks of technical training sessions each year and on-the-job training provided by employers. At the end of the training period, apprentices write an examination and, if successful, receive a Journeyperson Certificate issued by SATCC.

The province's regional colleges broker programs and courses offered by SIAST and the universities to communities throughout the province.

There are 41 private vocational schools in Saskatchewan offering a broad array of employment-related training programs in areas such as business and computer skills, cosmetology and esthetics, fashion design, hospitality management, massage therapy, and radio and television broadcasting. Private vocational schools are privately owned and operated. For consumer protection purposes, legislation requires that the schools, along with their programs and instructional staff, be registered with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Advanced Education.

The universities, SIAST, regional colleges, and Métis and First Nations institutions also provide an array of university and technical credit courses, as well as other postsecondary education and training opportunities by alternative means to increase opportunities for people in Saskatchewan to access flexible, high quality education and training at times and in places that best meet their needs. Courses are offered on-line via the Internet both on- and off-campus, as well as televised and mixed mode courses, using the provincial satellite telecommunications infrastructure provided by the SaskTel E-Learning Communication Network.

The universities and SIAST also offer independent home-study programs at a distance using one of a combination of print, video and audio tapes, Internet, video- and web-conferencing, and other communication media.

First- and second-year university courses, technical programs, and general interest, non-credit courses are delivered to communities throughout the regional colleges across the province via the SaskTel Network. Off-campus instruction is provided through satellite communication, computer technologies, and independent study.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Secondary school includes grades 10 through 12. Complete secondary-level standing requires 24 credits, with each credit representing about 100 hours of classroom instruction.

The two universities require secondary-level standing for admission. Some programs require minimum grade point averages of 65 per cent or more.

Admission requirements for SIAST certificate and diploma programs vary from program to program but generally include secondary-level standing, with specific high school course requirements for some SIAST programs.

Although the majority of trades no longer require specific prerequisites to enter apprenticeship training, employers will indenture apprentices only if the individuals have the educational qualifications, skills, and aptitude needed to be successful in the trade. It is recommended that individuals who plan to enter apprenticeship training complete high school, since many of the trades require math, science, and communications.

Most of the province's postsecondary institutions have special provisions for mature students who have not completed high school.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

At the universities, tuition varies according to the faculty or college that students choose. Undergraduate tuition in 2012-13 at the University of Regina was $5,310 and, at the University of Saskatchewan, $5,070. For comparability purposes, these figures are based on first-year Arts program tuition fees. For graduate programs, domestic tuition at the University of Regina was $3,942 and at the University of Saskatchewan was $3,447. The universities have a differential fee structure for international students. For all undergraduate programs except dentistry, the University of Saskatchewan charges international students a differential fee which is 2.5 times the fee charged to Canadians and permanent residents. At the University of Regina, the differential fee for visa students is three times that charged to Canadians and permanent residents. For graduate programs, international students at the University of Regina pay a surcharge of $800 per semester, up to $2,400 per year. At the University of Saskatchewan, international students pay 1.5 times the fees charged to Canadian students.

Tuition fees for a SIAST 30 week program in 2010-11 averaged approximately $3,540, but they vary from program to program.

In July 2002, tuition fees were implemented for apprenticeship technical training. As of July 1, 2010, these fees were $30 per week.

Saskatchewan Advanced Education provides a number of direct student supports to post-secondary learners:

Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship:
  • Beginning in 2012, the Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship (SAS) program provides all Grade 12 graduates in Saskatchewan, including Adult Basic Education and General Educational Development (GED) graduates, with up to $500 per year, to a maximum of $2,000, which will be applied to their tuition costs at a Saskatchewan post-secondary institution.
  • It is estimated that close to 5,000 new high school and GED graduates will benefit from the SAS each year.
  • The new scholarship will provide an incentive for all high school graduates to pursue a post-secondary education.

Saskatchewan Advantage Grant for Education Savings:
  • The Saskatchewan Advantage Grant for Education Savings program will provide a grant to a Registered Education Savings Plan at a rate of 10% of a subscriber's contributions to a maximum of $250 per child per year.
  • Saskatchewan will partner with the federal government to ensure processes are streamlined. Canadian financial institutions and educational savings promoters will also need to partner with government to deliver the Program.
  • Plans are proceeding to implement the Saskatchewan Advantage Grant for Education Savings program retroactively to January 1, 2013.

Saskatchewan Student Loans Program:
  • Approximately 12,000 loans have been authorized as of March 31, 2013, for the 2012-13 loan year. About $129M has been authorized of which $78M was federal assistance and $51M was provincial. This was approximately a 1% increase from 2011-12. The average amount of assistance authorized to individuals was approximately $10,600; which is consistent with the 2011-12 loan year.
  • About 57% of overall Saskatchewan financial assistance to students is non-repayable.

Scholarships:
  • Saskatchewan Innovation and Opportunity Scholarship (SIOS) program provides $5M to be matched by funds raised by post-secondary institutions making close to $10M available to post-secondary learners.
  • The Government of Saskatchewan created the Scholarship of Honour to provide recognition to Canadian Forces soldiers (regular and reserve) who served in designated military operations since January 2001. The Scholarship is available to returning soldiers and to the spouse and children of disabled or fallen soldiers. The Scholarship provides a one-time award of $5,000.
  • Other awards administered through the Student Aid Fund include: French Language; Queen Elizabeth II Scholarship for Parliamentary Studies; Queen Elizabeth II Centennial Aboriginal Scholarship; D.R. Simmons Memorial; and James Dickson Scholarship.

Graduate Retention Program:
  • The Graduate Retention Program provides up to $20,000 in tuition refunds over seven years, provided the individual files Saskatchewan income tax for each of those years.
  • The refund is based on the actual tuition paid as indicated on the T2202A receipts issued by the post-secondary institution, up to the maximum tuition refund amount by credential.
  • In the first four tax years, the graduate will receive 10% of the maximum tuition refund each year; and the final three tax years, the graduate will receive 20% of the maximum tuition refund each year.

2013-10-15


Postsecondary Education in Yukon

ToC / TdM Territorial Overview

The Advanced Education Branch of the Department of Education is responsible for postsecondary education in Yukon through its student financial assistance program, student employment programs, apprenticeship program, registration of private training agencies, and support to Yukon College.

Yukon College is a multi-campus institution located entirely in Yukon. In addition to the college's Ayamdigut campus in Whitehorse, the territorial capital, there are more than a dozen community campuses throughout the territory. Campus services include career and job training programs, part-time continuing education courses, academic and vocational courses, and career information and counselling.

In addition to providing territorial residents with career-oriented training programs, Yukon College is committed to Native and Northern studies and to promoting the territory's Aboriginal cultures.

ToC / TdM History

Yukon College traces its history to the establishment of the Yukon Vocational and Technical Training Centre in 1963. The centre became Yukon College in 1983.

The college moved to the Ayamdigut campus in 1988. The campus includes student residences, a cafeteria, a bookstore, a library, a resource centre, daycare facilities, a gymnasium, and other student services. Also located on the campus are the territorial archives, the Yukon Arts Centre, the Yukon Research Centre of Excellence, and the Yukon Native Language Centre, which offers certificate and diploma programs that focus on teaching, documenting, and promoting the various Native languages spoken in the territory.

Most community campuses offer classroom facilities, computers, televisions, video equipment, and small resource libraries. Some have access to distance education technologies.

Apprenticeship programs

Apprentice training was established in Yukon with the implementation of the Apprentice Training Act in 1964. Yukon apprentices gain their on-the-job training with Yukon employers and obtain in-school training through Yukon College or other institutions arranged by Advanced Education.

ToC / TdM Programs and Credentials Offered

Yukon College:

Yukon College programs are organized into five Schools, including: the School of Access; School of Science, Trades and Technology; School of Health, Education and Human Services; School of Liberal Arts; and the School of Management, Tourism and Hospitality.

Through these schools, Yukon College offers one-year certificate programs, two-year diploma programs, and degree programming. The College is also part of the BC Council on Admissions and Transfer (www.bccat.bc.ca) and thus Yukon College credits are fully transferrable to BC post-secondary institutions. Credits are also transferrable to Alberta institutions through a new agreement with BCCAT and to many institutions outside of BC and Alberta through individual arrangement. Some block transfer agreements are in place as well for institutions within Canada and the United States.

Many of the programs at Yukon College provide an integrated Northern perspective, such as the Renewable Resource Program, the Bachelor of Education – Yukon Native Teacher Education Program offered through the University of Regina but located at Yukon College, Northern Environmental Studies, Northern First Nations Studies, Northern Justice, Criminology and the Northern Environmental and Conservation Sciences Program offered through the University of Alberta.

Yukon College is partnered with the KIAC School of Visual Arts and the Tr'ondek Hwech'in First Nation to provide a Foundation year that is fully transferrable to several major art schools across Canada.

The Yukon Native Language Centre, administered by the Council for Yukon First Nations, offers a three-year certificate program for Native language instructors. The centre has been in operation since 1977 and is housed at the college. Students seeking information about the certificate program should contact the centre.

While the College is now permitted to grant degrees, it is currently providing degree programming in partnership with other universities. Degrees include: Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Social Work through the University of Regina, Master of Education through the University of Northern BC, Master of Public Administration and Master of Business Administration through the University of Alaska Southeast, and Bachelor of Science through the University of Alberta.

Apprenticeship

As of September 2010, there are 48 trades/occupations in which apprenticeship and certification are available in Yukon. Apprentices obtain a Certificate of Qualification issued by the Department of Education upon completion of all requirements of their apprentice program. Recognition of their completion credentials extends outside Yukon through the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program if a Red Seal examination is available in their trade.

ToC / TdM Admission Requirements

Secondary school includes grades 8 through 12 and is modeled on the system in British Columbia.

High school graduation is normally required for most university-level programs at the college. Required courses normally include English, algebra, social studies, and at least one laboratory science, with an overall average of C in the high school program. Special consideration is given to mature applicants who are at least 19 years old and who have completed the equivalent of high school. The college has an open admissions policy for students seeking to pursue developmental studies.

The entrance requirements for the apprenticeship program vary according to the needs of each trade and normally require high school course completion in Math, English and Science.

ToC / TdM Tuition and Financial Assistance

For 2010/2011, full-time tuition fees are $90.00 a credit ($270 for a three credit course). Nine credits of coursework are considered the full-time minimum. College Preparation courses and College Preparation ESL courses are $60.00 a credit. Full-time vocational programs including Trades, Technology, Office Administration, and non-semestered credit program tuition fees are $1,350 per term. Tuition fees for international students, other than residents of Alaska, are $3,690 per semester for ESL and $3,990 for academic and career programs per semester. International students are expected to be full-time.

The Yukon Department of Education administers a number of grant and training allowance programs for territorial residents. Yukon College provides two entrance awards per year to each Yukon graduating class. The awards amount to one year of free tuition.

There is no tuition for apprentice training. Financial assistance is normally available for apprentices to offset loss of income while attending in-school training, travel and book costs, and living-away-from-home costs where applicable through Employment Insurance funds.

Other scholarship, grant and bursary opportunities exist. Please see Yukon College Admissions or Student Services.

Revision: 2010-10-04


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